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News stories tagged with "slavery"

Annie, Mary, and Sarah Brown, ca. 1851. Photo: Library of Congress<br />
Annie, Mary, and Sarah Brown, ca. 1851. Photo: Library of Congress

Women and abolition the focus of lecture in Lake Placid on Saturday

The women in John Brown's family will be the focus of a lecture at the John Brown Day event in Lake Placid on Saturday. John Brown, the famous abolitionist, was convicted of treason and hanged for leading the raid on Harper's Ferry. He's buried on his family's farm in North Elba.

In 1849, he moved to a farm in the Adirondacks to lead freed slaves in farming. Each year, the non-profit organization, "John Brown Lives!" sponsors a series of lectures, workshops and a commemoration of John Brown's work to end slavery.

Todd Moe talks with historian Bonnie Laughlin-Schultz, who has written a book about the work of Mary, Brown's wife, and his daughters, Ruth and Annie, on behalf of the anti-slavery movement in the 19th century.

Laughlin-Schultz will lead a workshop for teachers on Saturday morning, and be part of a panel of historians talking about women and abolition. She's the author of the book, "The Tie That Bound Us: The Women of John Brown's Family and the Legacy of Radical Abolitionism."  Go to full article

Documenting the white slave trade in America's past

A Canton writer researching his own family history stumbled on the names of thousands of children kidnapped from Ireland, Scotland and England and sold into slavery in late 17th century America. Todd Moe talks with Richard Hayes Phillips who has compiled a genealogical index of white slaves in early Colonial America. His new reference book is titled, Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records.  Go to full article
Composer Glenn McClure.  Photo: McClure Productions, Inc.
Composer Glenn McClure. Photo: McClure Productions, Inc.

Hearing historic voices of freedom, again, through song

New music will be performed tonight and tomorrow in Saranac Lake and North Elba as part of the John Brown Day events. Voices of Timbuctoo is a new work based on the Adirondack settlement of Black farmers in the mid-1800's designed to secure voting rights. Abolitionist Gerrit Smith gave away 120,000 acres of his land, beginning in 1846, hoping the Adirondack wilderness would offer refuge to black families.

Voices of Timbuctoo, is an oratorio written by western New York composer Glenn McClure. It's part of what he calls a Musical Freedom Trail. Some of his other works written to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation have been performed in Alabama, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and later this month in Rochester.

McClure says his research for the oratorio included reading through diaries, letters and documents featuring the words of Gerrit Smith, John Brown, and the individuals who worked on the land that Smith had provided. McClure told Todd Moe that these texts illustrate hope and promise.  Go to full article
Modern abolitionist Ken Morris.  Photo: courtesy of Frederick Douglass Family Foundation
Modern abolitionist Ken Morris. Photo: courtesy of Frederick Douglass Family Foundation

Preview: Freedom Then, Freedom Now: The Long History of Emancipation

Frederick Douglass' great-great-great grandson will be the one of the speakers at this weekend's "Freedom Then, Freedom Now: The Long History of Emancipation" event in Lake Placid and Saranac Lake. The Friday/Saturday program for students, teachers and the public celebrates the 150th anniversary of Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. Presented by John Brown Lives! and North Country Community College, the event will feature a film, lectures, a new portrait of abolitionist John Brown and music.

Todd Moe spoke with Ken Morris, founder and president of the Frederick Douglas Family Foundation, a service learning organization that works to create a modern abolitionist movement in schools across the country. Morris is also the great-great grandson of Booker T. Washington.  Go to full article

Preview: "Fatal Promises" at SUNY Potsdam

Fighting for the abolition of modern day slavery is the subject of a new film that will be show at SUNY-Potsdam Thursday afternoon. Filmmaker Kat Rohrer will show and discuss her latest documentary, Fatal Promises. The film contains interviews with U.S. State Department, Congress, law enforcement officials and experts involved in the so-called war against human trafficking and modern day slavery, such as activist Gloria Steinem and actor Emma Thompson.

Kat Rohrer spoke with Todd Moe about her film, which she hopes will give a voice to modern day slaves.  Go to full article
Ken Morris is the keynote speaker at the historic John Brown Farm in Lake Placid this Saturday, 2-4 pm.
Ken Morris is the keynote speaker at the historic John Brown Farm in Lake Placid this Saturday, 2-4 pm.

A modern abolitionist remembers a famous ancestor

Frederick Douglass' great-great-great grandson will be the keynote speaker at the annual John Brown Day celebration this Saturday at the historic John Brown Farm in Lake Placid. Ken Morris will talk about the friendship and legacy of Douglass and fellow abolitionist John Brown. The two first met in Massachusetts in 1848, a decade after Douglass escaped from slavery on a Maryland plantation.

Ken Morris is founder and president of the Frederick Douglas Family Foundation, a service learning organization that works to create a modern abolitionist movement in schools across the country. Morris is also the great-great grandson of Booker T. Washington. Before dedicating his career to social issues, Morris managed a successful marketing and entertainment firm. But he told Todd Moe that he spent his teen years, "decisively disengaged from his family lineage."  Go to full article
Harriet Tubman in the 1880s
Harriet Tubman in the 1880s

Remembering an Underground Railroad icon

Todd Moe talks with Syracuse University historian Milton Sernett, an expert on African American history. He'll give two talks in Canton on Thursday on Harriet Tubman, and the Underground Railroad in northern New York. Todd talks with him about how Tubman became the dominant symbol of the Underground Railroad and is still an inspiration today for many Americans.  Go to full article
Slavery was legal in New York state until 1827
Slavery was legal in New York state until 1827

Exploring New York's slave legacy, past and present

This morning in Lake Placid, teachers and historians and activists begin a two-day conference to talk about slavery.

New Yorkers played a big role in the slave trade in the 18th and 19th centuries, financing and profiting from an industry that ruined the lives of more than 12 million Africans.

Slave-owning wasn't banned in this state until 1827. Modern-day activists say human trafficking and exploitation is once again on the rise.

Martha Swan is with a group called John Brown Lives.

She told Brian Mann that this conference, which is open to the public, will explore the history and present-day reality of slavery.  Go to full article
Painter's new book
Painter's new book

Author challenges notions of race in "The History of White People"

Author, educator and artist Nell Irvin Painter spoke at the Elizabethtown County Courthouse on Sunday. She read selections from her new book, "The History of White People," and fielded questions from the audience. The talk was part of a series sponsored by modern day anti-slavery organizations John Brown Lives! and John Brown Coming Home. Sarah Harris attended and has our story.  Go to full article
Activist Martha Swan from Westport and historian Andrew Buchanan from Whallonsburg
Activist Martha Swan from Westport and historian Andrew Buchanan from Whallonsburg

Fight to save "sacred ground" of John Brown's farm and burial site

Protesters will gather in Albany tomorrow to try to save dozens of New York state parks and historic sites. Governor David Paterson wants to close the parks this spring as part of an effort to cut an $8.2-billion budget deficit. At least nine parks in the North Country are targeted. Historians and civil rights activists are especially furious over the plan to shut down John Browns Farm in Lake Placid. As Brian Mann reports, the burial site of the famous Civil War-era abolitionist has been a pilgrimage site and a symbol of freedom for more than 150 years.  Go to full article

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