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News stories tagged with "snow"

Todd's toboggan class at the Adirondack Folk School in Lake Luzerne.  All we need is snow!  (Photo: Jim Mandle)
Todd's toboggan class at the Adirondack Folk School in Lake Luzerne. All we need is snow! (Photo: Jim Mandle)

Back to school to build a toboggan

You don't have to be a child to enjoy a simple winter treat -- sliding down a hill on a toboggan. A snowy backyard hill has been hard to find this month, but that didn't stop Todd Moe from signing up to build a wooden toboggan at the Adirondack Folk School in Lake Luzerne.

Historically an important method of transportation for native American peoples, the toboggan is probably the simplest sled in design, consisting of nothing more than slats of wood curved at the front. Building one requires patience...and a lot of sanding.  Go to full article
Scott Fuller and Matt Burnett put the finishing touches on their "E-Fraction" exhibit in Potsdam.
Scott Fuller and Matt Burnett put the finishing touches on their "E-Fraction" exhibit in Potsdam.

Winter outdoor art, even without snow

Artists Matt Burnett and Scott Fuller are known for creating several large scale outdoor art installations from Long Lake to Canton in recent years. They're back again this winter, and despite a lack of deep snow, they've put together an outdoor show at SUNY-Potsdam that combines elements of winter, nature and projected images.

Matt Burnett, who lives in the Adirondacks, and his collaborator Scott Fuller, from Maine, used large snow sculptures as a canvas for video images in a large scale outdoor exhibit at St. Lawrence University last year. They worked on similar outdoor art projects in Saranac Lake and Long Lake.

They launched their outdoor "E-Fraction" show last night on the SUNY Potsdam campus. It will be illuminated nightly on campus through the middle of next week. Todd Moe has a preview.  Go to full article
Photo: skibigtupper.org
Photo: skibigtupper.org

Big Tupper welcomes first skiers of the winter

The Big Tupper ski area in Tupper Lake was open Monday for the first time this year. The area is run by a non-profit group, mostly by volunteers. It doesn't manufacture snow.

So Big Tupper has had to wait through a long stretch of warm and snowless weather. But it got what it needed last week.  Go to full article
Snow builds up in Canton. Photo: John Stanford
Snow builds up in Canton. Photo: John Stanford

Winter storms cause outages, accidents, in St. Lawrence and Jefferson Counties

The North Country woke up Friday morning to more very wintry weather. In St. Lawrence county, schools were closed for a second day, as snow, sleet and rain continued to fall.

The St. Lawrence County sheriff reports several accidents on the roads--the county has issued a travel advisory saying the roads are icy and slushy and there may be tree limbs and power lines down in the roads.  Go to full article
Ice settled on trees and powerlines Thursday in the St. Lawrence Valley. Photo: John Stanford
Ice settled on trees and powerlines Thursday in the St. Lawrence Valley. Photo: John Stanford

Weather service says no repeat of '98 expected--but some cold weather ahead

Icy conditions in the St. Lawrence Valley today made for dangerous roads, school closures and a lot of worry about what's coming next. The National Weather Service says wintry weather will continue for the next day or so--but we don't have to worry about a repeat of the Ice Storm of '98.  Go to full article
Lake Placid from Whiteface, February 2010. Photo: Susan Cameron
Lake Placid from Whiteface, February 2010. Photo: Susan Cameron

Lack of "white Christmas" could leave ski resorts in the red

For those in the skiing business, this year's relatively warm temperatures and lack of snow are spelling trouble. Ski areas typically open around Thanksgiving and when there's no snow on the ground, they make it.

But it's been too warm for snowmaking. Ideally, it should be about 10 degrees. So many areas in the northeast have been forced to delay opening. Others have been operating at reduced capacity. And that's hurting the bottom line.  Go to full article
The 1941 Lake Placid High School men's ski team.  Peter Roland, Sr, is fifth from the right.
The 1941 Lake Placid High School men's ski team. Peter Roland, Sr, is fifth from the right.

Whiteface honors early ski pioneers

Seventy years ago today, a group of young skiers climbed Whiteface Mountain to build the first racing shelter at the top of what is now known as Wilderness Trail. Later that day, they came down the mountain to find out that Pearl Harbor had been bombed by the Japanese. Many went on to join the military in the early years of World War Two.

Whiteface will honor the men on Sunday with a special ceremony that will include lectures and historical displays. While most of those pioneers of alpine skiing on Whiteface and that fateful day are gone, their stories and memories live on through their children and friends. Todd Moe has more.  Go to full article
It did flood ten or twelve homes, four or five of them quite severely. There are some displaced people staying with friends and family.

Massive winter storm forces emergency declarations, home evacuations

The winter storm that began on Sunday and continued through Monday afternoon dumped more than two feet of snow to some parts of the North Country.

Bloomingdale in Franklin County was walloped by 32 inches of snow, with Saranac Lake and Tupper Lake close behind with 29 inches. Todd Moe has details.  Go to full article
Gregg Halsted, Canton.
Gregg Halsted, Canton.

Snow shovelers clamber up to the roof

As the snow piles up across the North Country, homeowners are looking nervously at those deep drifts piling up on their roofs. Snow can also block furnace and drier vents.

Officials say roof collapses are rare, but a few high-profile barn collapses have residents eager to get their roofs shoveled.

That's keeping contractors busy. David Sommerstein spoke with one on a rooftop in Canton yesterday.  Go to full article
You have things like oils and other fluids from automobiles and trucks. You have pet wastes. So these can all cause problems.

Snow removal pits clean streets against clean water

There's been an historic amount of snowfall around the Northeast. Snow totals range from 5 feet in Burlington, almost 7 feet in New York City, to almost 6 feet in Boston.

The extreme snowfall has pitted disposing snow against protecting the water. Many cities in the Northeast have run out of places to put the snow. They're asking for permission to dump it in waterways. As part of a collaboration with Northeast stations, Monica Brady-Myerov reports from Boston.  Go to full article

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