Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "solstice"

Winter Solstice. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/robef/">Rob Faulkner</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Winter Solstice. Photo: Rob Faulkner, CC some rights reserved

An appreciation for the darkest days of the year

Aileen O'Donoghue, who teaches astronomy and physics at St. Lawrence University, loves this time of year, when the sun sets early and rises late. She shares her enthusiasm with Martha Foley, and talks about some of the events of the ext couple of weeks.

The waning crescent moon meets Spica, Saturn and Mercury at sunrise in the next few days. And a winter meteor shower, the Geminids, peaks Dec.13. And then, there's the winter solstice coming up Dec. 21.  Go to full article
A Winter Solstice symbol
A Winter Solstice symbol

Celebrating the winter solstice

If the early evening gloom is getting to you, take comfort that the days are about to start getting longer. The winter solstice began at 12:30 this morning, marking the shortest day of the year and the start of winter.

Most of the customs, symbols, and rituals associated with Christmas -- holly, mistletoe and pine boughs -- actually are linked to Winter Solstice celebrations of ancient Pagan cultures. Winter Solstice has been celebrated in many cultures for thousands of years.

A Solstice family celebration will be held tonight (7 pm) at St. Lawrence University's Herring-Cole Hall with music, merriment, science and revelry.

A few years ago, a group gathered at St. Lawrence to celebrate the Solstice with songs, poems and candles.  Go to full article
Moon and planets, 9 pm
Moon and planets, 9 pm

Solstice, planets and more in the night sky

The summer solstice isn't until next Monday, but the earliest sunrise of the year was this morning, and the latest sunset isn't until later this month. St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue shared these fun facts, and talked about how the crescent moon will be a good guide to Venus, Mars, Saturn and the star, Spica, over the next few days when she visited our studios this morning.
(Ooops! Aileen says it's a waning crescent Moon near Jupiter on July 3 and 4...not a gibbous Moon.)  Go to full article

A summer solstice look at the stars

Martha Foley talks with Aileen O'Donogue, astronomy professor at St. Lawrence University, about what to look for in the night sky this time of year.  Go to full article

Solstice: celebrating the return of the sun

Tomorrow is the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year. Most of the customs, lore, symbols, and rituals associated with Christmas actually are linked to Winter Solstice celebrations of ancient Pagan cultures. Winter Solstice has been celebrated in many cultures for thousands of years. This start of the solar year is a celebration of light and the rebirth of the sun. In ancient Europe, it was known as Yule, from the Old Norse word, jul, meaning wheel. Todd Moe attended the annual Winter Solstice Celebration at St. Lawrence University, where students and faculty used candles, songs, poems and a dance to welcome the new year.  Go to full article

December?s night sky and the solstice

Martha Foley talks with St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue about the winter sky and solstice.  Go to full article

Star Talk: A Look at the December Sky

What is a solstice, anyway? Where's Mars these days? St. Lawrence University Astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue considers the December sky and takes listener questions.  Go to full article

Commentary: A Democratic Summer Solstice

The summer solstice is a day easily overlooked. No official holiday, no day off. But for commentator Jill Vaughan, June 21st is the beginning of something we've been waiting for- a season filled with accessible delights.  Go to full article

1-8 of 8