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News stories tagged with "soybean"

Biofuel Economy, Part I: Biodiesel

Biofuel. You hear a lot about it these days. And how the growing industry means new opportunities for farmers and foresters and other businesses in the North Country. Over the next few days we're going to take a closer look at what the biofuel economy might mean for the North Country. We'll look at big plans and small solutions.

First, what is biofuel? Biofuel means using biological material for energy. Like burning wood in a woodstove for heat. There are two kinds of biofuel used for transportation: ethanol and biodiesel. Ethanol is a gasoline additive made from vegetable crops - mostly corn. We'll talk more about ethanol tomorrow.

Today we'll look at biodiesel. Biodiesel is basically vegetable oil with the glycerin removed. It can run in diesel engines. It's mostly made from soybean oil. As fuel prices rise, It's becoming more cost-competitive. But as Gregory Warner reports, many consumers and farmers are still wary.  Go to full article
Ag Pro Ltd. is waiting to get more soybeans at a better price
Ag Pro Ltd. is waiting to get more soybeans at a better price

Soybean Plant Still Idle, Eyes New Products

A soybean processing plant in Massena is waiting for the price of beans to drop before it re-opens after shutting down at the end of June. But as David Sommerstein reports, it may turn to other products to generate some business.  Go to full article
Are soybeans a promising future for farmers like Bill Brewer?
Are soybeans a promising future for farmers like Bill Brewer?

Can Soybeans Take Root on North Country Farms?

Facing rock-bottom milk prices and mounting debt, dairy farmers are looking for other ways to stay in business. An extra field of hay or corn could help pay the bills in tight times.

Soybeans have been trumpeted as a promising alternative. In part two of our series on diversifying North Country agriculture, David Sommerstein reports soybeans will never be the staple crop they are in the Midwest, but they could be a part of a mix that redefines farming's future in the region.  Go to full article

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