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News stories tagged with "spring"

Lilies divided to make a fence border at the back of a perennial bed. Photo: <a heref="http://www.flickr.com/photos/kidmissile/4429824109/">kidmissile</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Lilies divided to make a fence border at the back of a perennial bed. Photo: kidmissile, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Shaping up perennials in the spring garden

Perennial beds need some attention in the spring. Dividing tubers can give them a renewed lease on life. And with a dry spring, a little irrigation might be in order. Martha Foley talks with Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy.  Go to full article
Snowy daffodils. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephencannon/2367604466/">Stephen Cannon</a> CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Snowy daffodils. Photo: Stephen Cannon CC some rights reserved

Chill winds, be gone! It's time for a little gardening

Spring has been a little frosty this year, so far, anyway. Cold wind and rain, even snow, along with frosty mornings might conspire to keep less-hardy gardeners (like Martha Foley) indoors.

But outside, green shoots are coming up. Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy, tells Martha it's past time to uncover the garlic and the daffodils. And it's OK to try a few early rows of onions and spinach.  Go to full article
Manure pile. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/87255087@N00/3572826346/">Knitting Iris</a>, CC some rights reserved
Manure pile. Photo: Knitting Iris, CC some rights reserved

Manure in the garden

Best practices in gardening can change over the years. Martha Foley and cooperative extension horticulturist Amy Ivy talk about new wisdom on the best ways to use manure in the early spring garden.  Go to full article
It's garden prep season.  Photo:  Todd Moe
It's garden prep season. Photo: Todd Moe

How to help your garden feed itself

Did you poke around your garden this weekend? As the snow melts, it's time to start thinking about spring cleaning in the lawn and garden. Horticulturist Amy Ivy says much of what you rake up could become beneficial mulch.  Go to full article
Starting seeds. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/bluehillranch/5160732368/">305 Seahill</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Starting seeds. Photo: 305 Seahill, CC some rights reserved

Cleaner is better for starting seeds

Tiny seedlings can fall prey to a number of soil-borne diseases that can linger in a gardener's trays and pots from one year to the next.

Cooperative Extension's Amy Ivy spent some time this past weekend sanitizing in advance of starting seeds inside. She tells Martha Foley why, and how.  Go to full article
Early sign of spring: Pussy Willows from Upper and Lower Lakes. Archive Photo of the Day: John Danis, Rensselaer Falls NY.
Early sign of spring: Pussy Willows from Upper and Lower Lakes. Archive Photo of the Day: John Danis, Rensselaer Falls NY.

An early glimpse of spring

With temperatures expected to reach the mid-50's, or higher, this afternoon, you're excused if you feel a touch of "spring fever" today. Todd Moe talks with horticulturist Amy Ivy about some of the early signs of spring around the region -- from pussy willows and red-stemmed dogwood to red winged blackbirds.  Go to full article
<em>Echinacea purpurea 'Maxima'</em> is one common perennial that's easy to start from seed. Photo: Ulf Eliasson, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Echinacea purpurea 'Maxima' is one common perennial that's easy to start from seed. Photo: Ulf Eliasson, CC some rights reserved

Getting a jump on the flower season

Starting seeds indoors is a mid-winter routine that gives gardeners a nice taste of the coming season: potting mix on the fingers, the fragrance of moist soil. Mostly, the trays and boxes of little seedlings are destined for the vegetable garden.

Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy has suggestions this week for starting flowers, perennial, that is, from seed as well.

She tells Martha Foley that starting perennials from seed is generally a more forgiving project than getting vegetable seedlings ready to go. Timing for the getting young flowers ready for transplanting isn't so crucial. One caveat: the timeline to maturity is longer.  Go to full article
Photo by Jennifer Herrick
Photo by Jennifer Herrick

Heard Up North: Pre-K dreams

What did you want to be when you grew up? Imagine sitting down with your four-year-old self today and telling him or her about your future. Would that child be surprised? Excited? Disappointed?

Last week the pre-kindergarten class at Lawrence Avenue Elementary School in Potsdam graduated. For the graduation ceremony, their teacher Jen Herrick had them record what they wanted to be when they grow up. These recordings played as each child walked across the stage to receive his or her diploma. Tasha Haverty turned some of them into today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article

This weekend in the Adirondacks

John Warren, of the Adirondack Almanack, joins us Friday mornings with information about local outdoor and back-country conditions.  Go to full article

This weekend in the Adirondacks

John Warren, of the Adirondack Almanack, joins us Friday mornings with information about local outdoor and back-country conditions.  Go to full article

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