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News stories tagged with "st-lawrence"

The six commissioners of the International Joint Commission took testimony from more than two dozen people last night in Alexandria Bay. Photo: David Sommerstein.
The six commissioners of the International Joint Commission took testimony from more than two dozen people last night in Alexandria Bay. Photo: David Sommerstein.

River residents give water levels plan thumbs up

There were no surprises last night at a public hearing in Alexandria Bay about managing water levels on Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. More than 150 area residents overwhelmingly supported a new plan that would restore wetlands, fish and wildlife, and lengthen the boating season.

The Jefferson and St. Lawrence county legislatures both support the plan. Assemblywoman Addie Russell spoke in favor, as did influential green group Save The River.

And there were no surprises the night before near Rochester, either, where residents of the south shore of Lake Ontario railed against the plan for the damage it could do to their property.

But as David Sommerstein reports, what emerged last night were personal stories that illustrate what's at stake, and the challenge the agency in charge of making the decision faces.  Go to full article
Captain Robin Walbridge, at the helm of the Bounty, while docked in Ogdensburg in 2010.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Captain Robin Walbridge, at the helm of the Bounty, while docked in Ogdensburg in 2010. Photo: Todd Moe

HMS Bounty captain, believed lost at sea, recalled sailing the St. Lawrence

The winds and waves of Hurricane Sandy this week took down an 18th century replica sailing ship used in three Hollywood films. On Monday, the Coast Guard rescued 14 of the HMS Bounty's crew off the coast of North Carolina. Claudene Christian, a crew member, was found unresponsive in the ocean off the North Carolina coast Monday evening. She was one of two crew members believed washed overboard when the Bounty began taking on water. Authorities say captain Robin Walbridge is still missing.

Walbridge had sailed the HMS Bounty all over the world, including the Galapagos, Holland, and British Columbia.

Two years ago, Walbridge and his crew docked the Bounty at Ogdensburg, while on their way to the Great Lakes United Tall Ships Challenge. Walbridge told Todd Moe that sailing the St. Lawrence was a favorite trip.  Go to full article
Matt Regan, researcher with SUNY's College of Environmental Science and Forestry, helps students churn up the dirt to expose the seed bank after removing cattails from a plot at Eel Bay, on Wellesley Island. Photo: Joanna Richards
Matt Regan, researcher with SUNY's College of Environmental Science and Forestry, helps students churn up the dirt to expose the seed bank after removing cattails from a plot at Eel Bay, on Wellesley Island. Photo: Joanna Richards

Kids study water levels' impact on St. Lawrence wetlands

Construction of the giant hydropower dam near Massena in the 1950s forever tamed the once-wild St. Lawrence River. It allowed engineers to harness the river's natural ebb and flow for energy production and to protect homes and ports at the same time. But in the process, it hurt the indigenous plants and animals that depend on those highs and lows to survive.

The environmental group Save The River has been leading a charge to persuade the agency that controls water levels to return more natural ebbs and flows to the St. Lawrence. One way is by giving the younger generation of River residents a "hands-on" lesson.  Go to full article

International St. Lawrence River Control Board lowers water levels...but how low will they go?

This spring's rain has left water levels on Lake Ontario well above normal--higher than the International St Lawrence River Board of Control is comfortable with.

To fix the problem, the board earlier this month started letting more water out at the Moses-Saunders dam in Massena. That means some areas of the St. Lawrence will be seeing low water levels. That has some worried about the boating season.

Nora Flaherty has more.  Go to full article

As politicians line up against Canada boat fine, border agency looks to clarify rules.

The US Department of State said on Tuesday that Canadian Border Officials were "well within their rights" when they threatened to seize an American fisherman's boat and fined him $1000 in May. It said the officials were just enforcing their rule that boats entering Canadian waters - not simply in transit - must report in on special phones located in marinas and other locations on land.

But politicians on both sides of the border are lining up against the move.

If you are on the river and are in doubt about whether you need to check in with Canadian Customs, call 204-983-3500.  Go to full article

Hacketts tries to regain footing amidst lawsuits

It's been an up-and-down week for an embattled North Country retail chain. Hacketts reopened its store in Massena this week. Its parent company finished paying off a $5 million debt. But new lawsuits against the company have emerged, including one from the family that is the retailers' namesake. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Then-Lt. Gov. Paterson led the Renewable Energy Task Force (NYS Photo, Feb. 25 2008)
Then-Lt. Gov. Paterson led the Renewable Energy Task Force (NYS Photo, Feb. 25 2008)

On environment, Gov. Paterson follows "a giant"

Former Governor Eliot Spitzer will be remembered for his accomplishments cleaning up Wall Street. But Spitzer was also a national crusader for environmental causes. As Attorney General, he sued coal-burning power plants and pushed the Federal EPA to adopt stricter clean-air laws. In his first year as Governor, Spitzer approved a huge land purchase in the Adirondack Park and fought a controversial power corridor project. As Governor David Paterson takes office, environmental activists say he has big shoes to fill. But they also say the Harlem Democrat has a strong track record pushing alternative energy and other green causes. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
Focus the Nation draws in North Country campuses
Focus the Nation draws in North Country campuses

Students uncertain about life after climate change

Last week, more than 1500 college campuses around the country joined in an effort called "Focus the Nation." The goal was to convince politicians and the public that climate change should be a top issue in this election year. As Brian Mann reports, students and faculty at St. Lawrence University agree that the planet is getting warmer and that humans are to blame. But they're still not sure what they or their leaders should do about it.  Go to full article
New exhibition in Montreal looks at "the corn people"
New exhibition in Montreal looks at "the corn people"

Rediscovering the "Corn People" of the St. Lawrence Valley

Five centuries ago, the St. Lawrence valley, from Watertown to Quebec City, was ruled by a culture that modern anthropologists call "the corn people." When the first French explorer Jacques Cartier arrived in 1534, he found bustling towns and well-ordered fields. A few decades later, when Samuel de Champlain reached the same area, the corn people were gone. Their villages were empty. Their fields were abandoned. A new exhibition in Montreal explores the mystery of their disappearance. But as Brian Mann reports, some members of the Mohawk community say the scientists and historians have the story wrong.  Go to full article

Senate Vote Could Close Thrift Stores, Neighborhood Centers

The House has slashed over half the funding for an anti-poverty fund called the Community Services Block Grant. The money funds neighborhood centers around the country. Experts say it would mean many of those centers would have to close. The Senate is expected to vote on the issue later this summer. The cuts would take effect in 2006. Gregory Warner reports from a neighborhood center and thrift store in Canton.  Go to full article

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