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News stories tagged with "st-lawrence-county"

The St. Lawrence County courthouse and legislative building.
The St. Lawrence County courthouse and legislative building.

High-level legal feud escalates in St. Lawrence County

A legal feud between two prominent St. Lawrence County officials continues to escalate.

Days after being served a subpoena to deliver 10 years of financial records to a grand jury, county Administrator Karen St. Hilaire asked a stay of any grand jury action.

And she filed complaints with the state Attorney General's office against District Attorney Mary Rain.  Go to full article
The 28-member joint advisory committee in the Potsdam High school library last fall. After a comprehensive study, school boards have decided it's now up to the public to vote on the merger. Photo: David Sommerstein
The 28-member joint advisory committee in the Potsdam High school library last fall. After a comprehensive study, school boards have decided it's now up to the public to vote on the merger. Photo: David Sommerstein

Canton-Potsdam school merger process moves to public vote

The Canton school board voted unanimously to move the merger process forward last night. Earlier this week, the Potsdam school board also voted in favor of public vote on the merger.

Bill Gregory is superintendent of Canton Central School District. He says now, the schools have to sure make the community understands precisely what it would mean if the two schools merge.

"Beginning in late August and extending through the end of October there will be an intense public information campaign with a series of town hall meetings and meetings with all the community service organizations to really answer questions and to alleviate fears in some cases about what may or may not occur with a merger."

A straw poll vote is scheduled for October 30, and a binding referendum is scheduled for mid-December.  Go to full article
SUNY Potsdam students use trowels and brushes to gently excavate soil and peel through layers of history along the Raquette River in Potsdam. Photo: Todd Moe
SUNY Potsdam students use trowels and brushes to gently excavate soil and peel through layers of history along the Raquette River in Potsdam. Photo: Todd Moe

SUNY Potsdam students dig into history along the Raquette River

Student archaeologists excavating a site along the Raquette River in Potsdam have unearthed pieces of prehistoric Native American pottery, stone tools and part of a spear tip that could be 5,000 years old.

The SUNY Potsdam Anthropology Department is overseeing the summer school program on college property along the river. It allows budding young scholars the chance to get their hands dirty while learning more about uncovering buried artifacts, mapping and field research.

Todd Moe stopped by the dig site recently to watch the students search for more clues to the North Country's ancient past.  Go to full article
Ogdensburg Bridge & Port Authority director, Wade Davis, and Assemblywoman Addie Russell show U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer the plans for extending the runway, indicated in blue on the diagram. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Ogdensburg Bridge & Port Authority director, Wade Davis, and Assemblywoman Addie Russell show U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer the plans for extending the runway, indicated in blue on the diagram. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Schumer: Ogdensburg airport ok "waiting on someone's desk"

The city of Ogdensburg is getting ready to take off into a bigger air travel market. The Ogdensburg airport signed a contract last month with Allegiant Air to fly 170-passenger jet planes on and off of its runway. Officials expect the new service will attract tens of thousands of Canadian passengers and become a new economic driver.

The problem is...the runway is too short.

The airport has submitted a $12-15 million plan to build a longer runway. But it's stalled in Washington. Yesterday, U.S. Senator Charles Schumer came in person to say he's going to expedite the process.  Go to full article
County administrator Karen St. Hilaire. Photo: Julie Grant
County administrator Karen St. Hilaire. Photo: Julie Grant

St. Lawrence County DA seeks grand jury probe of county administrator

A legal feud is brewing between two top officials in St. Lawrence County.

First-year district attorney Mary Rain wants a grand jury to investigate whether county administrator Karen St. Hilaire mishandled two cases involving county money.

One regards a microphone system for the Board of Legislators. The second deals with a $500,000 grant the county failed to get. But a former county official says there's a reason for the missed grant.  Go to full article
A map of the Mohawk land claim.
A map of the Mohawk land claim.

Franklin County has the next move in Mohawk land claim deal

A federal appeals board has ruled the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe can make 39 acres of land it owns part of the Akwesasne reservation.

The tribe has used the land as a garbage transfer station for more than a decade. But it's technically within the borders of Franklin County, just west of the town of Fort Covington. The tribe originally petitioned to have the parcel added to the reservation seven years ago.

The details of the transfer will remain unclear until Franklin County decides what to do about a proposed settlement to the larger Mohawk land claim. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Mares Wares Arts Fest Tuesday in Morristown

The backyard at Mare's Wares Pottery in Morristown will become an outdoor artist gallery tomorrow, filled with dozens of artisans, writers, music, food and demonstrations.

Karan Cross is an Ogdensburg artist who's helping to organize the annual festival. She says it began seven years ago with about a dozen artists and now includes over 90.

Cross told Todd Moe that it's an afternoon and evening of creativity and artistry along the St. Lawrence River.  Go to full article
The Northern Symphonic Winds at Norwood Village Green in 2012. Photo: Northern Symphonic Winds
The Northern Symphonic Winds at Norwood Village Green in 2012. Photo: Northern Symphonic Winds

Northern Symphonic Winds at the Norwood Village Green tonight

The Norwood Village Green Concert Series continues tonight with the Potsdam-based Northern Symphonic Winds and continues Sunday evening with Irish-American singer Cathie Ryan.

Barb Heller talked about the upcoming performances with series director Joe Liotta.  Go to full article
Gunnison Chapel last week. Photo: Kelly Bartlett
Gunnison Chapel last week. Photo: Kelly Bartlett

St. Lawrence U's Gunnison Chapel repairs getting underway

A spokesperson from St. Lawrence University says that work is starting this month on St. Lawrence University's Gunnison Chapel, which was heavily damaged in a fire last October.  Go to full article
Tri-Town Processing co-owner Tom Liberty. NCPR file photo: David Sommerstein
Tri-Town Processing co-owner Tom Liberty. NCPR file photo: David Sommerstein

Tri-Town Processing will close "short term" to USDA-inspected slaughter

For newer updates on this story see: Tri-Town in negotiations with USDA

Update, 6/20/14, 10:30Tri-Town and the USDA plan to talk today about the situation. The USDA declined to comment on the situation yesterday.

Update, 6/19/14, 3 PM: We're continuing to report on this story and have this information as of this afternoon. The USDA did not shut down Tri-Town Processing. The USDA did suspend Tri-Town on Tuesday, but the plant was allowed to resume operations on Wednesday. Of their own accord, co-owners Tom and Jeff Liberty decided to suspend the part of their processing facility that allowed Tri-Town to put the USDA-inspected stamp on its products. The Libertys say they are frustrated with USDA inspectors, and are prepared to do only "custom" processing - or processing meats that are not for resale. Tri-Town and the USDA are still in negotiations. We'll have more later today.

***
It looks like one of the North Country's only slaughterhouses will be closing its doors to much of its business: Tri-Town Processing, a family-owned plant in Brasher Falls has been open for 37 years. But as of yesterday, its owners say that while they'll still be taking on custom animals, they will no longer be able place that USDA-inspected stamp on their product.

Jeff Liberty owns the Tri-Town Plant with his father Tom. "Over the last few months, the current staff from the USDA has made it so difficult to operate that we've decided in the short term to forgo any federally inspected slaughter."

Yesterday morning, Liberty and his father had to call many of their customers, local farmers, who have relied on them to process their animals, that for now, they'll have to bring their animals somewhere else. "This is the first day that I woke up and I didn't really want to come to work."  Go to full article

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