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News stories tagged with "st-lawrence-river"

Rona Waddington.  Photo: St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival
Rona Waddington. Photo: St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival

St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival chooses new leader

The St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival in Prescott, Ontario has hired a new artistic director. Rona Waddington, who brought "Hamlet" to Prescott last summer, succeeds Ian Farthing in December. Farthing will step down at the end of this summer's 12th season.

Waddington has an impressive background as an actor and director at theatres across Canada and Europe. And she told Todd Moe she loves the idea of presenting Shakespeare outdoors along the St. Lawrence in the summer months.  Go to full article
Dr. Paul Bowser of Cornell University holds a muskellunge impacted by the VHS virus. Photo: Bowser Lab/Cornell University
Dr. Paul Bowser of Cornell University holds a muskellunge impacted by the VHS virus. Photo: Bowser Lab/Cornell University

Muskies recovering on the St. Lawrence River

Now that it's warming up, more and more people are going fishing. A lot of anglers have their eyes on muskellunge, or muskies. Muskies are popular for their size, and their ability to put up a fight.

"I've never been muskie fishing. But I know a lot of people that do, and I guess hooking into one of these fish is quite an experience! I guess it would be analogous to catching a torpedo," says David MacNeill, a fisheries specialist at New York Sea Grant, which is funding research on muskies.  Go to full article
U.S. observed temperature change since 1895, with an inset showing change in the Northeast. Image: <a href="http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/report/our-changing-climate/recent-us-temperature-trends">National Climate Assessment</a>
U.S. observed temperature change since 1895, with an inset showing change in the Northeast. Image: National Climate Assessment

Five ways climate change is already affecting your life (or will soon)

Tuesday, the federal government released the most comprehensive scientific report on climate change in the U.S. ever produced (find the full report here, and find an overview here). Its message is clear and urgent.

It says human-caused climate change is happening now and it's affecting our everyday lives. Jerry Melillo is the study's co-author. "It is affecting us in our pocketbooks and on our land in every region of the United States," Melillo said at the White House rollout of the report (the Northeast regional report.) "It is changing the lives of farmers, mayors, engineers, town planners, truckers, and foresters." Many Republicans in Congress dismissed the report as "alarmist."

The report is the third National Climate Assessment, the first in six years. Its findings have implications for North Country agriculture, disease, and the health of the Adirondack Park. Here are five big takeaways:  Go to full article
Since 1978, Richard Feltoe has reenacted a Canadian militia soldier from the War of 1812.  His topic at the War of 1812 Heritage Talks is The Upper Canada Militia in Peace and War, 1808-1816.  Photo: Richard Feltoe
Since 1978, Richard Feltoe has reenacted a Canadian militia soldier from the War of 1812. His topic at the War of 1812 Heritage Talks is The Upper Canada Militia in Peace and War, 1808-1816. Photo: Richard Feltoe

Ogdensburg explores War of 1812 history, heroes and everyday life

Battle reenactments, tours, exhibits and other events are set for this year's commemoration of the bicentennial of the War of 1812. The U.S. and Britain fought some of the war's bloodiest battles two centuries ago this year in Ontario and parts of upstate New York from Lake Ontario to Lake Champlain.

This weekend, the Fort La Presentation Association in Ogdensburg presents its annual War of 1812 Heritage Talks at the Freight House restaurant. Todd Moe spoke with historian and organizer Michael Whittaker, who says it's two days of traditional music and a slate of speakers and exhibits.  Go to full article
The Port of Oswego, waiting for opening next week. Photo: Gino Geruntino, WRVO
The Port of Oswego, waiting for opening next week. Photo: Gino Geruntino, WRVO

St. Lawrence River ice slows ships, delays Port of Oswego opening

Ice floes slowing ships in the St. Lawrence River are delaying the opening of the shipping season at the Port of Oswego till next week.

Executive director Zelko Kirincich says the shipping season was scheduled to begin last Friday. But ships waited in line earlier this week as thick ice forced the Canadian Coast Guard to send out ice breakers to reopen shipping lanes.  Go to full article
Alcoa workers at a press conference in 2007 during which the company promised to maintain 1065 jobs. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Alcoa workers at a press conference in 2007 during which the company promised to maintain 1065 jobs. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Alcoa reduces Massena workforce to 750

Alcoa has reached an agreement with New York State to keep its low cost power contract and proceed with a plan to build a new modern potline at its East plant in Massena.

But in the interim, the aluminum giant will reduce its workforce to 750 jobs, below the 900 job threshold it promised three years ago.  Go to full article
The crew of Coast Guard Cutter <em>Neah Bay</em>, homeported in Cleveland, works to keep the <em>CSL Laurentien</em> moving during an escort in eastern Lake Erie March 27, 2014. Photo: courtesy USCG
The crew of Coast Guard Cutter Neah Bay, homeported in Cleveland, works to keep the CSL Laurentien moving during an escort in eastern Lake Erie March 27, 2014. Photo: courtesy USCG

Relentless winter's ice delays St. Lawrence River shipping

Three U.S. Coast Guard cutter vessels are to help with annual ice-breaking operations in Thunder Bay's harbour on Lake Superior--the far end of the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Canadian Coast Guard crews and their icebreakers are leading the effort after the harsh winter produced what are being called "unusually heavy and persistent" ice conditions.

The annual opening of the Seaway is one of the signs of spring in the North Country. But as with pretty much everything this year, winter is still having its way with the calendar.

The Seaway is holding its opening ceremony to welcome commercial ship traffic between the Great Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean this morning near Buffalo. But it's had to delay the opening of the St. Lawrence River part of the Seaway for three days until Monday due to ice.

David Sommerstein joined Martha Foley to discuss the annual debate over the Seaway's opening date.  Go to full article
The Robinson Bay breaks Seaway ice back in 2001. NCPR file photo: Lisa Lazenby
The Robinson Bay breaks Seaway ice back in 2001. NCPR file photo: Lisa Lazenby

Seaway ice breakers coming, season opens March 31

In a press release yesterday, the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Authority announced ice-breaking will soon be underway in advance of the opening of the shipping season March 31.

Lori Curran, spokesperson for the agency, says it's hard to be specific about exactly when ice-breaking will progress upstream to the Eisenhower and Snell Locks near Massena. She said they're now waiting for a Canadian ice-breaker to clear the channel from the first lock in Montreal. She said it's expected to start moving upstream over the next couple of days.

Ice fishermen, snowmobilers, ATV riders are asked to stay away areas where ice has been cleared to avoid numerous open water leads and unstable ice cover caused by the clearing.  Go to full article
Angler and TV personality Don Meissner holding a smallmouth bas. Photo courtesy St. Lawrence County Chamber of Commerce
Angler and TV personality Don Meissner holding a smallmouth bas. Photo courtesy St. Lawrence County Chamber of Commerce

Seven ways to keep bass safe when angling

With so much snow on the ground, bass fishing might seem far away, but for anglers it's always time to think about bass fishing. New research that finds the increase in catch and release bass fishing tournaments stresses fish got us thinking about ways to do it most safely. Here are some tips from B.A.S.S., the organization that puts on tournaments like last year's Bassmasters Elite in Waddington, NY.  Go to full article
Bassmaster Elite angler Randy Howell reels in a small mouth during a tournament practice session near Ogdensburg last summer. Photo: David Sommerstein
Bassmaster Elite angler Randy Howell reels in a small mouth during a tournament practice session near Ogdensburg last summer. Photo: David Sommerstein

How much do Bass fishing tournaments hurt the fish?

Last summer, the country's top professional anglers were catching hundreds of pounds of Bass in the St. Lawrence River for the Bassmasters Elite tournament. Elite series officials deemed it a big success. A study found it generated $1 million to $3 million for the region.

But are tournaments like Bassmasters Elite bad for the fish? The number of catch-and-release tournaments on the St. Lawrence, Lake Champlain, Black Lake, and other bodies of water has been increasing. Years of research has led to protocols and rules that protect fish stock. But a team of researchers at Lake Champlain Sea Grant has found it does indeed stress out the fish, and it can take them months to recover.  Go to full article

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