Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "st-lawrence-seaway"

John Elwood Cook often writes music from the deck of his home on Wellesley Island. Photo: Todd Moe
John Elwood Cook often writes music from the deck of his home on Wellesley Island. Photo: Todd Moe

How Wellesley Island artist John Elwood Cook brings an idea to song

Thousand Islands artist and musician John Elwood Cook loves life on the St. Lawrence River. He grew up on Wellesley Island and can trace his local family history back to the Revolutionary War era. His visual art has been exhibited in galleries and museums across the country. He's found a niche in combining his visual art with music. He owns a collection of vintage Gibson guitars and enjoys writing music about local history, people and places along the river.

Earlier this week at his home on Wellesley Island with an amazing riverscape in the background, Cook shared his song "Chippewa Bay 1888" with Todd Moe during a conversation about his art. The music pays tribute to another North Country artist, Frederic Remington.  Go to full article
The <em>Robinson Bay</em> breaks Seaway ice back in 2001. NCPR file photo: Lisa Lazenby
The Robinson Bay breaks Seaway ice back in 2001. NCPR file photo: Lisa Lazenby

Shipping hampered by ice on St. Lawrence Seaway

CLAYTON, N.Y. (AP) Huge chunks of ice are causing problems on the Saint Lawrence Seaway even though the shipping season started two weeks ago.

Canadian Coast Guard ice cutters were trying to disperse ice clogging the shipping channel Tuesday as several ocean-bound cargo vessels waited to pass through.  Go to full article
The remains of two Riverside Heights buildings under the waves of the St. Lawrence Seaway.  Photo: Louis Helbig
The remains of two Riverside Heights buildings under the waves of the St. Lawrence Seaway. Photo: Louis Helbig

Photos: Ottawa artist explores the Seaway's "sunken" communities

Since 2009, Ontario aerial photographer Louis Helbig has been collecting stories and memories of life along the St. Lawrence River before and after Inundation Day (July 1, 1958), when Canadian and American villages along the St. Lawrence were flooded and thousands of people relocated, so the St. Lawrence Seaway could come into being. Helbig's "Sunken Villages" project includes images and stories about the communities that have been hidden under the St. Lawrence Seaway for over 50 years.

For the last few years, Helbig has arranged exhibitions of his birds-eye view of the underwater remnants of houses and streets on the Canadian side of the Seaway. Now, he's looking for stories and family histories from the American side. On Thursday night at 6:30, he'll make an audio and visual presentation at the Massena Public Library.  Go to full article
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Professor John Janssen. Photo by Chuck Quirmbach.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Professor John Janssen. Photo by Chuck Quirmbach.

Great Lakes fish on a diet

Scientists say one way climate change is harming the Great Lakes is by warming the water too quickly in the spring.

That can decrease food for tiny creatures in the lakes--the creatures that game fish like trout and salmon eat.

In the second part of our week-long series, In Warm Water, Chuck Quirmbach has more on what leaner meals for fish might mean for the people who like to catch them.  Go to full article
Herring fisherman and president of the North Shore Commercial Fishing Association, Steve Dahl, says the commercial fishing industry on Lake Superior is doing better than ever, but experts predict fish populations will shift due to warming waters. Photo by Doug Fairchild, courtesy of the Minnesota Sea Grant Institute
Herring fisherman and president of the North Shore Commercial Fishing Association, Steve Dahl, says the commercial fishing industry on Lake Superior is doing better than ever, but experts predict fish populations will shift due to warming waters. Photo by Doug Fairchild, courtesy of the Minnesota Sea Grant Institute

A chilly Lake Superior warms up

We kick off our week-long series In Warm Water: Fish and the Changing Great Lakes with a look at Lake Superior.

It has long been the coldest and most pristine Great Lake. Its frigid waters have helped defend it from some invasive species that have plagued the other Great Lakes. But Lake Superior's future could look radically different. Warming water and decreasing ice are threatening the habitat of some of the lake's most iconic fish.  Go to full article
U.S. Seaway Administrator Betty Sutton, at Seaway Administration in Massena Tuesday. Photo: David Sommerstein.
U.S. Seaway Administrator Betty Sutton, at Seaway Administration in Massena Tuesday. Photo: David Sommerstein.

New Seaway chief seeks economic, green balance

Shipping on the St. Lawrence Seaway generates billions of dollars for the Great Lakes economy in the U.S. and Canada. But it also opened the door to damage from invasive species and forever changed the shape and ecology of the St. Lawrence River itself.

The new U.S. chief of the St. Lawrence Seaway is making her first visit to Massena this week. Betty Sutton is touring the Seaway's two locks on the St. Lawrence River, the vessel traffic control room, and meeting with many of the Seaway's 135 employees in Massena.

Betty Sutton's very first appointment in Massena was a sit-down with David Sommerstein.

CORRECTION: A previous version of this story (and the audio version) refer to the Seaway Administration position as a seven year term.

That is no longer the case, as Nancy Alcalde, SLSDC spokeswoman, points out. In 2002, The Appointment and Efficiency Streamlining Act of 2011, P.L. 112-166, made this position an appointment "at the pleasure of the President". It is also no longer subject to U.S. Senate confirmation.  Go to full article
Harbor at Picton, Ontario. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/thebigdurian/5168287747/">Shreyans Bhansali</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Harbor at Picton, Ontario. Photo: Shreyans Bhansali, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

New water levels plan controversial for Canada, NNY harbors

The water levels in Lake Ontario have a significant impact on the economic and environmental viability of harbors in upstate New York and Canada. As a result, a proposed plan to change the management of those water levels has raised some concerns in waterfront communities.  Go to full article
An aerial view of the intersection of King Hwy No. 2 and Aultsville Road, downtown Aultsville, Ontario. The outline of businesses and homes can clearly be seen along both sides of both roads.  Photo: Louis Helbig
An aerial view of the intersection of King Hwy No. 2 and Aultsville Road, downtown Aultsville, Ontario. The outline of businesses and homes can clearly be seen along both sides of both roads. Photo: Louis Helbig

Aerial photos reveal Ontario communities flooded 50 years

It's been more than 50 years since Inundation Day -- July 1, 1958, when ten Ontario communities along the St. Lawrence were purposefully flooded and 6,500 people relocated so the St. Lawrence Seaway could come into being. This spring, an Ottawa photographer will be collecting stories about the so-called "sunken villages" - that handful of Canadian villages have been hidden under the St. Lawrence Seaway for over 50 years.

Todd Moe talks with Ottawa aerial photographer Louis Helbig about his "Sunken Villages" project of photos of the lost communities between Cornwall and Prescott, Ontario. For the last few years, Helbig has arranged exhibitions of his birds-eye-view of the underwater remnants of houses and streets. Now, he's looking for stories and family histories to accompany the photos.  Go to full article
if itís if appropriately implemented, the plan would begin to reverse damage caused by 60 years of regulations

IJC releases water level plan

A new plan for controlling water levels in lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River is intended to restore diversity in shoreline plant and animal communities by permitting greater fluctuations.

The International Joint Commission, representing both the U.S. and Canada, released the regulatory plan yesterday.  Go to full article
Photo: American Carp Society
Photo: American Carp Society

The Ins & Outs of Carp Fishing

Many anglers consider carp the mucky, ugly bottom-feeders of the fish world in this country. But in Great Britain and Europe, carp are prized fighters and millions of anglers fish day and night to haul in a trophy catch. The World Carp Championship kicks off today on the St. Lawrence River near Waddington and runs through next week. Hundreds of anglers will compete from more than 20 countries. David Sommerstein spent time with a carp guide and a British angler to find out what carp fishing's all about. This story first aired in 2003.  Go to full article

1-10 of 52  next 10 »  last »