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News stories tagged with "st-lawrence-seaway"

Fed court okays ballast law

A federal judge has upheld the constitutionality of a state law restricting ballast water on ships entering the Great Lakes. As Rachel Lippmann reports, the ruling clears the way for other states to take similar action to control the spread of invasive species.  Go to full article

"Swish & spit" works for ships

New research supports the practice of "swish and spit" for ocean-going ships that ply the St. Lawrence Seaway. As Mark Brush reports, the practice of rinsing ballast tanks with ocean salt water will help stop aquatic pests from getting into U.S. waters.  Go to full article

Ballast law battle builds

The fight over foreign invasive pests in cargo ships is heating up. Mark Brush reports environmental and conservation groups are going to court to defend one of the toughest ballast water laws in the country.  Go to full article
Bloody Red Mysid
Bloody Red Mysid

Hitchhiking invaders keep coming

A new invasive species has joined zebra and quagga mussels, the brown gobie and other species that have hitchhiked to the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River in ballast water. Rebecca Williams' report shows just how easily an even worse invader could make its way into the waterway.  Go to full article

Michigan toughens ballast water laws

Invasive species continue to be one of the biggest problems facing the St. Lawrence River and Great Lakes. One state has a new law in effect to stop ocean-going ships from bringing in foreign pests when they enter the St. Lawrence Seaway. Rebecca Williams reports neighboring states are watching to see what happens next.  Go to full article

Bush friend new Seaway chief

A close friend and college roommate of President Bush was sworn in as the new head of the St. Lawrence Seaway yesterday. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
A U.S. Coast Guard inflatable boat at Chippewa Bay with deployed oil booms in the background.
A U.S. Coast Guard inflatable boat at Chippewa Bay with deployed oil booms in the background.

Spill drill exposes Seaway response needs

A tanker had gone aground on Whiskey Island shoal on the St. Lawrence Seaway, spilling 100,000 gallons of thick oil. That was the nightmare scenario emergency responders on both sides of the river faced in a drill exercise last Thursday and Friday. 150 people charted the simulated oil's progress downriver, laid booms to contain it, and then reviewed what went right and wrong. As David Sommerstein reports, the exercise demonstrated the first hours after an accident need the most attention.  Go to full article

Bush to nominate new Seaway chief

President Bush will nominate a college roommate and political ally to run the St. Lawrence Seaway. The White House announced Tuesday that Collister Johnson, Jr. will be nominated to serve a seven-year term. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Study Weighs Costs of Shipping

For years, many environmentalists have wanted to stop ocean-going ship traffic on the Great Lakes. That's because vessels traveling from the ocean to the Lakes sometimes carry invasive species. But opponents call the industry a vital part of the economy. A new study paid for by the Joyce Foundation questions how vital that industry really is. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Shawn Allee reports.  Go to full article

States to Crack Down on Ship Ballast Tanks?

A Michigan lawmaker is urging other states in the region to enter into a multi-state compact aimed at limiting the influx of invasive species into the Lakes. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Sarah Hulett reports.  Go to full article

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