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News stories tagged with "st-lawrence-university"

Edwards theatre event explores technology, memory, with banjo!

"Now at the Uncertain Hour" is an intriguing new theatrical event for live performance, online streaming, and radio. The show takes the audience on a journey through the landscape of a soldier's memory as a collector attempts to make sense of what will be left behind.

In the midst of the relentless currents of time, the play asks what we can take hold of that will go on, that will not be lost. The collector combs through the soldier's memories as captured on an old reel-to-reel tape as they blend with the sounds of old time banjo and modular synthesizer to create a unique listening experience.
Todd Moe stopped by a rehearsal last week at St. Lawrence University to talk with cast members Megan MacDonald, Wes Kline, Camilla Ammirati and director Charlie Pepiton.  Go to full article
Apparent retrograde motion of Mars in 2003. Animation: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Apparent_retrograde_motion_of_Mars_in_2003.gif">Eugene Alvin Villar</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Apparent retrograde motion of Mars in 2003. Animation: Eugene Alvin Villar, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Spring comes to the solar system

St. Lawrence University physicist Aileen O'Donoghue stopped by the NCPR studio this morning with an update on all the ways we can chart the change of season without ever looking at a thermometer. Just watch the winter constellations, like Orion, disappear and the spring sky emerge.

She also maps out where Earth is in relation to the other planets racing around the Sun, and which ones we can see just now. Venus is still bright in the morning. We're moving away from Jupiter, and you'd probably need really good binoculars or a telescope now to see its moons. And Mars is red and bright in the east early in the evening. If you follow its motion night by night, you'll notice it's going "backwards" for a while now. She explains this retrograde motion, which was a key clue in the ancients' realization that we are not the center of the universe.  Go to full article
SLU junior David Smith is an Environmental Studies major and organizer of NC350.
SLU junior David Smith is an Environmental Studies major and organizer of NC350.

"Do One Thing" to help the planet, says Canton environmentalist

A St. Lawrence University student is hoping everyone does something on Earth Day tomorrow to help the planet. David Smith is junior at SLU and also organizer for NC350, a local chapter of 350.org, an international organization addressing global climate change.

NC350 includes community members and students from across the North Country working to promote environmental and social justice in the region. Todd Moe spoke with Smith about Earth Day and the "Do One Thing" campaign.  Go to full article
SLU junior David Smith is an Environmental Studies major and lives on the school's sustainability farm a few miles from campus.  Chores include tending a flock of chickens. Photo: Todd Moe
SLU junior David Smith is an Environmental Studies major and lives on the school's sustainability farm a few miles from campus. Chores include tending a flock of chickens. Photo: Todd Moe

St. Lawrence junior's coursework includes farm chores

Sometimes spending a college semester abroad means just a few miles down the road. St. Lawrence University junior David Smith, a Potsdam native, is one of nine students living and studying sustainability issues on a 33-acre farm leased from Cornell Cooperative Extension this spring.

The farm, just south of Canton, includes a house, outbuildings, gardens, orchards, a chicken coop and classroom space. Professors visit the farm to teach courses. This spring, students will help prep the gardens that will feed participants in the fall semester program.

Next Tuesday, Earth Day, will be a busy time for Smith, who combines his college studies with environmental activism. Smith is the organizer of NC350, a local chapter of 350.org, an international organization working to address global climate change.

Todd Moe stopped by SLU's Sustainability Semester farm to get one young person's take on helping the planet.  Go to full article
Doug Huntley, superintendent of Queensbury Union Free school district. Photo courtesy Doug Huntley
Doug Huntley, superintendent of Queensbury Union Free school district. Photo courtesy Doug Huntley

Should schools teach career-specific skills earlier?

Monday at St. Lawrence University, officials, educators and community leaders will gather for the 12th annual North Country Symposium. This year, the day-long conference will focus on sustaining the North Country's schools and ask how education can be more tightly woven into the fabric of North Country life.

One of the keynote speakers believes students need to begin pursuing the skills they'll need for a career earlier. Doug Huntley is superintendent of the Queensbury Union Free school district near Glens Falls, and a former superintendent of Massena Central schools.  Go to full article
This inmate drawing on a prison envelope is part of the "Cellblock Visions" exhibit on display at SLU's Brush Art Gallery through mid-April. Photo courtesy Phyllis Kornfeld
This inmate drawing on a prison envelope is part of the "Cellblock Visions" exhibit on display at SLU's Brush Art Gallery through mid-April. Photo courtesy Phyllis Kornfeld

In Canton, "Cellblock Visions" shows off prison inmates' art

There's an alternative art world flourishing in American prisons. "Cellblock Visions," an exhibit at the Brush Art Gallery at St. Lawrence University this spring, features artwork by inmates from county jails to death row. Curator Phyllis Kornfeld, who has taught art courses in the prison system for more than 30 years, will give a lecture on the exhibit in Griffiths Arts Center, room 123, Tuesday at 7pm.

Todd Moe spoke with Kornfeld, who began her career teaching art in prisons in Oklahoma in 1983 (hear that interview by clicking "listen" above, or read the transcription below.) Today, she works at prisons in Massachusetts. She says even after 30 years, she finds the art created behind bars to be "fresh and amazing". Kornfeld says men and women inmates, having no previous training, turn to art for a sense of self-respect, respect for others and a way to find peace.

View pictures from the exhibit below.  Go to full article
Five Omar Mualimmak spent nearly five years in a solitary confinement cell. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/m_at/8566414982/">Matthew Thompson</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Five Omar Mualimmak spent nearly five years in a solitary confinement cell. Photo: Matthew Thompson, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Prison reform advocate will speak in Canton tonight

St. Lawrence University is hosting a series of events this month aimed at opening up a public conversation about the prison system.

Last night was the first: Five Omar Mualimmak spoke to a lecture hall full of students and community members, about his near five years in solitary confinement, on charges that were later overturned. He also talked about his work to reform the system, and the art he created in prison.  Go to full article
This year's "wobbly" polar vortex (left) compared to last year's more "compact" vortex. Image: NOAA
This year's "wobbly" polar vortex (left) compared to last year's more "compact" vortex. Image: NOAA

What's up in the sky, and what's up with the weather

The night sky, and so much more today from St. Lawrence University Physics professor Aileen O'Donoghue.

In fact it's a double-header today: the sky, and the wobbly polar vortex.  Go to full article
Ecologist and film maker John D. Liu. Photo: Screen shot from Liu documentary <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBLZmwlPa8A"><em>Green Gold</em></a>
Ecologist and film maker John D. Liu. Photo: Screen shot from Liu documentary Green Gold

Environmental filmmaker chases the biggest story

Filmmaker and ecologist John D. Liu is in the North Country this week. He's meeting with students and giving a talk "Choosing the Pathway to Sustainability: Ecological Restoration" at Clarkson University, St. Lawrence University and Paul Smith's College.

Liu is an American who lives in China. As a journalist, he covered some of the really big geopolitical stories of our time: the normalization of relations with China, and the collapse of the Soviet Union. He worked for CBS News for 10 years, and left there in 1990.

He's concentrated on ecological film making since the mid-1990s. He's written, produced and directed films on grasslands and deserts, stories where the interaction of people and the land has not worked so well--ruined landscapes and also their restoration.  Go to full article
Blair McMillen. Photo:  www.blairmcmillen.com
Blair McMillen. Photo: www.blairmcmillen.com

Listen: Pianist Blair McMillen performs live at St. Lawrence University

Pianist Blair McMillen shares some of his favorite music in a solo recital tonight at 8 pm at St. Lawrence University. Hailed as one of piano's "brilliant stars" by The New York Times, McMillen performed live this morning during The Eight O'clock Hour from the Peterson-Kermani Performance Hall at SLU.

McMillen, who lives and teaches in New York City, loves a wide variety of music, from Baroque to Blues. During the live broadcast this morning, he shared a new piece, "Toyed Together," written for him by composer David Rakowski, for piano and toy piano.  Go to full article

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