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News stories tagged with "stephen-harper"

Michael Healey as the Prime Minister  Photo: GCTC/Andrew Alexander
Michael Healey as the Prime Minister Photo: GCTC/Andrew Alexander

Theatre Review: "Proud" at the Great Canadian Theatre Company

"It's a comedy influenced by writers like George Bernard Shaw and Aaron Sorkin who both illuminate the politics of the day," says Michael Healey. "It's important to get people talking about politics and about their national government."  Go to full article
A family at last Saturday's Idle No More march over the Cornwall bridge.  Photo by David Sommerstein.
A family at last Saturday's Idle No More march over the Cornwall bridge. Photo by David Sommerstein.

Big expectations for "Idle No More" meeting in Canada

First Nations chiefs are meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper in Ottawa today. The meeting is a response to months of protests by a grassroots aboriginal group called Idle No More.

The group is demanding the government address issues such as poverty, land claims, and profits from natural resources.

As Karen Kelly reports from Ottawa, it may be difficult for today's meeting to soothe decades of discontent.  Go to full article

Ontarians React To Election

Monday's federal election in Canada sent the Liberal Party out of power after 12 years. But like his Liberal predecessor, Paul Martin, Conservative leader Stephen Harper will have a minority government. That means forming a coalition of support in order to move legislation and policy in Parliament. The Conservatives will control 124 seats. Liberals will have 103. Lucy Martin spoke with people in Osgoode, Ontario for their views on what just happened--and what might lie ahead.  Go to full article

Canadians Vote For Change

Stephen Harper says Canada "has voted for change." Canadians have chosen to end 12 years of Liberal rule, and give a minority Conservative government led by Harper a chance. The prime minister in waiting said he'll govern for all Canadians, not just for those who voted Tory. Harper says his top priority is to clean up government by making it more accountable to taxpayers. Although Canadians have given power to the Conservatives, voters are keeping them on a short leash. Harper will lead a minority government with 124 seats. Liberals will have 103. The Bloc Quebecois got 51 seats, and the NDP won 29 -- 10 more than the last election. Martha Foley spoke with Dr. Robert Thacker, chairman of the Canadian Studies Department at St. Lawrence University, about the vote, and its likely consequences.  Go to full article

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