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News stories tagged with "stone"

Climbing, collecting and shaping rocks

About 20 years ago, Matt Horner started climbing rocks and ice in the High Peaks. Today, the Keene Valley resident continues to work and play around granite boulders, but he's found a way to make art. More than 60 of his works -- carved sculptures and stone vessels -- are on display at View in Old Forge this season.

Matt is also a professional fly-fishing guide and well-acquainted with the smooth river stones in the region. He told Todd Moe that shaping stones started a few years ago while working on a rock wall.  Go to full article
<em>Sisyphean Circle</em>, 2010, by John Van Alstine
Sisyphean Circle, 2010, by John Van Alstine

Preview: "Elements in Alliance" in Lake Placid

NCPR is media sponsor for Elements in Alliance: Natural Visions, an installation of sculpture, furniture and painting at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts. The show opens tonight with a reception from 5-7 pm. The exhibit, which continues through August 7th, features the art of John Van Alstine, Jonathan Sweet, Caroline Ramersdorfer and Barney Bellinger. Todd Moe spoke with John Van Alstine about the exhibit.  Go to full article
Co-instructor Troy Headrick explains how stone walls are constructed. The wooden frame and strings help guide builders on the correct taper. Most double-faced walls will have an A shape. Photo by Jane Lindholm
Co-instructor Troy Headrick explains how stone walls are constructed. The wooden frame and strings help guide builders on the correct taper. Most double-faced walls will have an A shape. Photo by Jane Lindholm

Rebuilding old stone walls

Old stone walls date back four centuries in the Northeast. They're the vestiges of old farm boundaries; sometimes still keeping sheep and cows from wandering too far. A number of states are considering legislation to preserve these wandering traces of history. As part of a collaboration with Northeast public radio stations, Jane Lindholm of Vermont Public Radio reports. (Northeast environmental coverage is part of the NPR Local News Initiative.)  Go to full article
Carver Mattiusi Iyaituk with Okpik Pitseolak as she lights a traditional "qulliq", or stone lamp.  Both artists will return for this year's "Arts Alive" event in Ottawa on May 31st.
Carver Mattiusi Iyaituk with Okpik Pitseolak as she lights a traditional "qulliq", or stone lamp. Both artists will return for this year's "Arts Alive" event in Ottawa on May 31st.

The challenge of stone art

Getting the right material is just one of many challenges in making art. Sometimes that takes more effort than usual! For two years now, Ottawa Correspondent Lucy Martin has found the Inuit Artists' Shop "Arts Alive" event a great way to meet artists from across the Canadian Arctic. The day of courtyard demonstrations lets the public see how the art is made and satisfy curiosity about life and art in the far north. Here's stone carver Mattiusi Iyaituk in a conversation with a visitor from British Columbia, at last April's event.  Go to full article
The Fralick's 1832 stone house near Cape Vincent.
The Fralick's 1832 stone house near Cape Vincent.

Stone Building Group Collecting Opinions, Histories

Stone house owners in Jefferson county are collecting stories, histories and photos of the old buildings. Some say there may be more stone structures in Jefferson county than any other county in the U.S. Todd Moe toured an old stone house near Cape Vincent and chatted with owners Sandra and David Fralick, who are members of the Stone Building Appreciation Society. The group wants to update a listing of old stone buildings in the North Country. For more information about the Stone Building Appreciation Society call 315-782-1558.  Go to full article

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