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News stories tagged with "storytelling"

A folk painting by Angel Callanaupa Alvarez for the story, "Tell Me, Bright Stars".
A folk painting by Angel Callanaupa Alvarez for the story, "Tell Me, Bright Stars".

Listen: a Christmas story from Peru

Last week, we heard Vermont weaver, writer and teacher Elizabeth VanBuskirk talk about her new book, Beyond the Stones of Machu Picchu. For over 30 years, she and her husband have traveled to the land of the Incas � the ancient citadel Machu Picchu, the Sacred Valley and Cusco.

VanBuskirk has collected Inca folktales and some of her own favorite stories in the book. Here, she reads from the Christmas story, Tell Me, Bright Stars. It's not a folk tale, but a story inspired by her friend, Nilda Calla�aupa Alvarez, Director of The Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco.

On Christmas Eve in the Andes Mountains of Peru, a young Inca girl finds a unique way to save her family from the threat of starvation.  Go to full article
Illustration for a 1354 edition of <em>Kalilah wa-Dimnah</em> (The Fables of Bidpai). <a href="http://treasures.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/The-Fables-of-Bidpal">Bodleian Libraries</a>, University of Oxford
Illustration for a 1354 edition of Kalilah wa-Dimnah (The Fables of Bidpai). Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford

Story Traveler: One source of bad information

Gioia Timpanelli tells fables from India and the Middle East: "Fables of Bidpai" and "The Kallila and Dimna," and recites a poem by Robert Bly, "One Source of Bad Information."

Story Traveler is the here and now of unscripted storytelling with stories from everywhere in the world--stories for the heart to hear and the mind to imagine.  Go to full article
Old Growth Grapevine: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/artbycharlieasher/3953322119/"> Charlie Asher</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Old Growth Grapevine: Charlie Asher, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Story Traveler: The Good Is Never Lost

What is the good? This is an important question to ask in stories of old and of today. In this folk story heard as a child, Gioia tells us in both Sicilian and English, that the good is never determined by only one thing.

Story Traveler is the here and now of unscripted storytelling with stories from everywhere in the world--stories for the heart to hear and the mind to imagine.  Go to full article
Three Questions: <a href="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/File:Three_Questions.PNG">Michael Sevier</a>
Three Questions: Michael Sevier

Story Traveler: "The Three Questions," Leo Tolstoy

What is the best time to do each thing? Who are the most important people to work with? What is the most important thing to do at all times? These are the three questions explored by a King who thought that he would never fail if he knew the answers. Join Gioia in this parable to find out if the king's questions will be answered.

Story Traveler is the here and now of unscripted storytelling with stories from everywhere in the world--stories for the heart to hear and the mind to imagine.  Go to full article
<a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f1/Mampukuji.jpg"> Mampukuji </a>, an Obaku Zen Buddhist temple in Uji, Kyoto, Japan.
Mampukuji , an Obaku Zen Buddhist temple in Uji, Kyoto, Japan.

Story Traveler: The First Principle

This is the story of acting without doing and working with less effort. When one goes to the Mampukuji, an Obaku temple in Kyoto, Japan, they will see the words "The First Principle" carved above the gate. Listen along as zen master Kosen's work is critiqued time and time again by his own pupil and why his calligraphy has been a part of the temple for over 200 years.

Story Traveler is the here and now of unscripted storytelling with stories from everywhere in the world--stories for the heart to hear and the mind to imagine.  Go to full article
Illustration for "The Lion and the Mouse," Harrison Weir, from <em>Three Hundred Aesop's Fables</em> by George Fyler Townsend, 1867. Public domain.
Illustration for "The Lion and the Mouse," Harrison Weir, from Three Hundred Aesop's Fables by George Fyler Townsend, 1867. Public domain.

Story Traveler: Aesop's Fables

Gioia Timpanelli tells "The Crow and the Pitcher, ""The Wolf and the Crane," a cautionary fable about gratitude and greed, and "The Lion and the Mouse," which tells you that you can never know your friends will turn out to be.

Story Traveler is the here and now of unscripted storytelling with stories from everywhere in the world--stories for the heart to hear and the mind to imagine.  Go to full article

Story Traveler: Heaven and Hell

Story Traveler is the here and now of unscripted storytelling with stories from everywhere in the world--stories for the heart to hear and the mind to imagine.  Go to full article

Story Traveler: Is that so?

Story Traveler is the here and now of unscripted storytelling with stories from everywhere in the world--stories for the heart to hear and the mind to imagine.  Go to full article

Story Traveler: Teacher and the Student

Story Traveler is the here and now of unscripted storytelling with stories from everywhere in the world--stories for the heart to hear and the mind to imagine.  Go to full article
Pyrites storyteller Jan Hutslar
Pyrites storyteller Jan Hutslar

Storytellers share the oldest form of theatre in Canton

You're invited to a preview of World Storytelling Day this Saturday night in Canton. A group of local storytellers and guests from the Ottawa Storytellers will host an evening of spinning their tales at the Unitarian Universalist Church (7 pm).

World Storytelling Day is next Wednesday. It's a global celebration of the art of oral storytelling, celebrated every year on the spring equinox in the northern hemisphere, the first day of autumn in the southern.

Pyrites storyteller Jan Hutslar joins Todd Moe in the studio to share her love of telling tales with a story by Joseph Anthony, The Dandelion Seed.  Go to full article

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