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News stories tagged with "students"

Students gather on short notice to remember the Gunnison Memorial Chapel. Photo: Zach Hirsch
Students gather on short notice to remember the Gunnison Memorial Chapel. Photo: Zach Hirsch

Students hold impromptu service at Gunnison

St. Lawrence University held a formal gathering last evening honoring Gunnison Chapel and its carillon- damaged in a fire early Sunday. There were speeches, and choral groups sang.

But Tuesday was too long to wait for some. The university's Outing Club organized an impromptu gathering Monday at 5, just when the bells would have begun their daily concert.

Students gathered near the chapel. In the background, a recorded version of the bells played from the burnt spire. In the foreground: cowbells.  Go to full article

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Clarkson University executive chef Kyle Mayette at the Main Street Grill, where its sells locally grown food from veggies to burgers.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Clarkson University executive chef Kyle Mayette at the Main Street Grill, where its sells locally grown food from veggies to burgers. Photo: Todd Moe

Clarkson eatery goes local

Serving locally grown food in college dining spots is nothing new, but Clarkson University has taken the concept one step further. Todd Moe checks out an eatery at Clarkson where every ingredient comes from a farm within 200 miles of the Potsdam campus: beef from Brasher Falls, goat cheese from Vermont and vegetables from Quebec.

Clarkson executive chef Kyle Mayette says the challenge will be creating a menu at the Main Street Grill in the Cheel Campus Center that changes seasonally.  Go to full article

Colleges go digital to combat undergrad weight gains

It used to be the Freshman 5. Now it's the Freshman 15. But on-demand digital health information seems to be helping control those extra pounds undergrads put on.  Go to full article

Time's running out on the old GED

39 million Americans, a fifth of the population, never completed high school, one of the factors used to measure literacy rates. Of those, only about 1% earn a GED certificate or the equivalent of a high school diploma each year. The test, which has been around since 1942, is poised to undergo major changes to prepare its recipients for a competitive workplace.

For Front and Center, Laurie Stern has this story from Minnesota.  Go to full article
Students during Feburary lobbying effort in Albany.  (Photo: Carol Pynchon)
Students during Feburary lobbying effort in Albany. (Photo: Carol Pynchon)

Canton students reflect on advocacy effort, as they prepare to graduate

High school seniors are getting ready to graduate. For students in the A-P Government class at Canton Central, it's been a year of learning firsthand how government works. They got riled up when they learned that their school might need to eliminate things like sports and theatre, as well as jobs because of decisions in the state budget. So, they took action.

Along with a few hundred parents and school officials, they took a bus trip to Albany in February to lobby lawmakers. In the end, the state restored some money to Canton Central and other rural schools. However, the district still plans to cut programs, and more than 24 jobs.

Now that it's graduation time, the seniors have had a few months to reflect on their lobbying effort. We spoke with Susannah Sudborough and Pat McGaw who were both touched by the experience but came away with opposite conclusions about what it will mean for their own futures.

Our story was produced by Julie Grant and Natasha Haverty.  Go to full article
Montreal police have struggled to cope with three months of continuing demonstrations. Photo: Monica Eileen Patterson
Montreal police have struggled to cope with three months of continuing demonstrations. Photo: Monica Eileen Patterson

In Montreal, student protests target Quebec's Liberal government

Massive demonstrations in the city of Montreal have continued for more than a hundred straight days.

The protest began when Quebec's Liberal Party tried to hike tuition rates for college students. But the sometimes violent street rallies have exploded into a much wider debate in French Canada over civil liberties and the future of popular social programs.

As Brian Mann reports, some students are now calling for the resignation of Quebec's premier.  Go to full article
Sue Stebbins  (Photo: SUNY Potsdam)
Sue Stebbins (Photo: SUNY Potsdam)

Diversity expert among critics of NYPD surveillance of Muslim students

New York civil rights advocates want a meeting with Gov. Andrew Cuomo following a decision by the attorney general's office not to investigate the New York Police Department over its monitoring of Muslim students following the Sept. 11 attack.

The Associated Press reports that in a letter yesterday, the New York Civil Rights Coalition refuses to accept the decision by Attorney General Eric Schneiderman.

Schneiderman's office said there were legal obstacles that prevented the probe.
The coalition writes that the governor must direct state authorities to investigate the surveillance.

The Associated Press reported last week that the New York Police Department kept close watch on websites and blogs maintained by Muslim student associations across the northeast U.S., including at SUNY Potsdam and Clarkson University.

The surveillance reportedly took place in 2006 and 2007. Mayor Michael Bloomberg has faced a firestorm of criticism. But he continues to defend the police department, saying the city needs to be vigilant against terrorism.

Susan Stebbins is an anthropology professor at SUNY Potsdam. She's also special assistant to the president for diversity. The surveillance reportedly took place in 2006 and 2007. But Stebbins tells Julie Grant the college is just finding out about it now. (NCPR did request an interview with the New York Police Department, but didn't hear back for this story.)  Go to full article
Morgan Kelly (left) from Saranac High School and Assemblywoman Janet Duprey with delegates from Clinton and Essex county high schools
Morgan Kelly (left) from Saranac High School and Assemblywoman Janet Duprey with delegates from Clinton and Essex county high schools

Students gather to meet lawmakers, talk politics

NCPR kicked off election coverage with a series of stories this week. See below for more on the 23rd district race for the House of Representatives.

Politics are everywhere these days, from the bitter Republican primary fight that's playing out on our TV screens to the redistricting battle in Albany that could shake up politics right here in our own backyard. As 2012 goes on, the news and conversation will only get louder and more intense.

Most high school students can't vote, but politics plays a big role in their lives, too. And they're paying attention, at least the teens are who gathered recently in Peru to talk about government and politics. Our correspondent Sarah Harris sends this report.  Go to full article
Dogs and students during Finals Week at St. Lawrence.
Dogs and students during Finals Week at St. Lawrence.

Heard Up North: A day for dogs during finals

This has been one of the busiest and most stressful weeks of the year for students at area colleges. It's finals week, right before the holidays. Faculty and staff at St. Lawrence University took some time recently to share their dogs' love with students to help ease the stress.

Golden labs, beagles and mixed-breed mutts were among the canine therapists on campus last Friday. They performed simple tricks, chased toys and enjoyed occasional treats with the students. Our intern, Roger Miller, is a senior at St. Lawrence. He mingled with the pack of dogs and students in Gunnison Chapel during a study break for today's "Heard Up North."  Go to full article

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