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News stories tagged with "summer"

This weekend in the Adirondacks

John Warren, of the Adirondack Almanack, joins us Friday mornings with information about local outdoor and back-country conditions.  Go to full article
Jackie Altman paints "en plein air" near Lake Placid.
Jackie Altman paints "en plein air" near Lake Placid.

Art that conveys a sense of immediacy

Many Adirondack artists will tell you that our region offers nearly all the elements a landscape painter looks for - mountains, trees, waterways and ever-changing hues of green, gray and blue. You'll find dozens of artists outdoors this week in the Adirondacks painting "plein air" during Saranac Lake's Fourth Annual Plein Air Festival, part of the "Great Adirondack Days" celebration.

It's a time-honored tradition, particularly by artists who want to convey a sense of immediacy. They'll find a spot with a great view of a mountain or along a stream, prop up an easel and paint just as they see it. Most works are completed within hours on the spot. Spontaneity is key. Bugs, rain and fleeting sunlight are challenges.

Last summer, Todd Moe tagged along when Lake Placid artist Jackie Altman returned to a favorite spot with views of some of the High Peaks.  Go to full article
Spined soldier bug eating Mexican bean beetle larvae. Photo: USDA
Spined soldier bug eating Mexican bean beetle larvae. Photo: USDA

Bugs in your garden? Look closer!

Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy confesses a passion for beneficial insects in her weekly conversation with Martha Foley. In fact, she says some of the creepiest looking insects are among the best. They talk about ladybug larva and other alligator-like young, spined soldier bugs, hover flies, and more.  Go to full article

This weekend in the Adirondacks

John Warren, of the Adirondack Almanack, joins us Friday mornings with information about local outdoor and back-country conditions.  Go to full article
The Palace Theater in Lake Placid, late on a Saturday night. Photos: Natasha Haverty
The Palace Theater in Lake Placid, late on a Saturday night. Photos: Natasha Haverty

The Last Picture Show? The future of small movie theaters in the North Country

The last decade or so, the North Country has seen a rebirth of its small-town movie theaters. Screens from Tupper Lake to Indian Lake to Ausable Forks have reopened. From Canton to Old Forge, small cinemas are often a big part of the local nightlife, offering a spark of light and glitz.

But the movie industry is changing, shifting fast from old-fashioned film projectors to new, high-tech digital systems. As Natasha Haverty reports, the price tag for that conversion is high and some North Country theater owners worry they might not survive the transition.  Go to full article
Kirk Sullivan, wearing a plaid shirt, says he feels at ease when he's shooting films. Photo provided by Kirk Sullivan
Kirk Sullivan, wearing a plaid shirt, says he feels at ease when he's shooting films. Photo provided by Kirk Sullivan

Filmmaker returns for a premiere in the Adirondacks

Adirondack native Kirk Sullivan will premiere his latest short film at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts this evening.

Sullivan's father, Fred, was also a filmmaker, known for The Beer Drinker's Guide to Fitness and Filmmaking and Cold River. He passed away unexpectedly in 1996. Kirk Sullivan, now 30, was born and raised in Saranac Lake and now lives in Los Angeles.

Tonight's film, The Come Up is a 10-minute short that Kirk Sullivan describes as a fun action-comedy. He wrapped up work on the film at the end of July. As Chris Morris reports, it takes place on the set of a major Hollywood producer, a familiar environment for filmmaker.  Go to full article
Yellowjacket. Photo: <a href-"http://www.flickr.com/photos/via/">Via Tsuji</a>, cc <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Yellowjacket. Photo: Via Tsuji, cc some rights reserved

In the garden: tomato troubles, yellowjackets, and more

Continuing hot, dry weather can lead to a range of challenges in the yard and garden. It's perfect weather for tomato troubles, including blossom end rot, early blight and septoria. Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy tells Martha Foley proper watering is the key to ending blossom end rot. She's also got a warning about stinging insects this time of year.  Go to full article

This weekend in the Adirondacks

John Warren, of the Adirondack Almanack, joins us Friday mornings with information about local outdoor and back-country conditions.  Go to full article
Spiny water flea. Photo: National Park Service
Spiny water flea. Photo: National Park Service

Lake George population complicates spiny water flea control

There's more bad news about an invasive species threatening the North Country's waterways.
With concern mounting over how to keep the spiny water flea from infesting Lake Champlain, New York environmental officials confirmed yesterday that the non-native organism has been confirmed in Lake George.

The tiny crustacean is known to edge out native species, while also fouling fishing gear. In a statement, DEC commissioner Joe Martens said "the discovery of spiny water flea in Lake George is not welcome news."  Go to full article
Spiny water flea. Photo: National Park Service
Spiny water flea. Photo: National Park Service

Lake George population complicates spiny water flea control

There's more bad news about an invasive species threatening the North Country's waterways.
With concern mounting over how to keep the spiny water flea from infesting Lake Champlain, New York environmental officials confirmed yesterday that the non-native organism has been confirmed in Lake George.

The tiny crustacean is known to edge out native species, while also fouling fishing gear. In a statement, DEC commissioner Joe Martens said "the discovery of spiny water flea in Lake George is not welcome news."  Go to full article

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