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News stories tagged with "summer"

Testing soil Ph. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/naturewise/">London Permaculture</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Testing soil Ph. Photo: London Permaculture, CC some rights reserved

Taking stock of garden soil

You've planned, planted, watered and weeded. Now, with frost and freeze warnings this past weekend, it's about time to tuck the garden in for the winter. Tidying away the spent tomatoes and bean plants, prepping to plant garlic, whatever your fall list includes, Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy has another important entry. She tells Martha Foley about why soil should be tested every few years, and how to do it.  Go to full article

This weekend in the Adirondacks

This is John Warren from the Adirondack Almanack with your look at outdoor recreation conditions around the Adirondacks for this weekend.  Go to full article
Paddlers in the 30th annual Adirondack Canoe Classic approach the finish line of the three-day, 90-mile race on Lake Flower in Saranac Lake. Photo: Chris Knight, <em>Adirondack Daily Enterprise</em>
Paddlers in the 30th annual Adirondack Canoe Classic approach the finish line of the three-day, 90-mile race on Lake Flower in Saranac Lake. Photo: Chris Knight, Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Paddlers race 90 miles through sunshine and storms

The 90-mile Adirondack Canoe Classic wrapped up on Sunday. This was the 30th anniversary of the three-day race, which follows a course of lakes, rivers and carries from Old Forge to Saranac Lake.

It featured two days of sunshine and clear skies, and one day of stormy weather that put even seasoned paddlers to the test.  Go to full article
Dry spell in the garden. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/78428166@N00/">Tony Alter</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">some rights reserved</a>
Dry spell in the garden. Photo: Tony Alter, CC some rights reserved

Approaching the end for the gardening season

It's been a tough season for flowers and vegetables, and for the gardeners who nurture them. Some things have flourished, it's true: see our All In blog post, "Late summer garden...and my new motto," from Ellen Rocco. But mostly, it's been too dry, really hot, and buggy.

Martha Foley talks with Cornell Cooperative Extension's Amy Ivy about cleaning out a dried out flower garden, and looking ahead to next year.  Go to full article

This weekend in the Adirondacks

John Warren, of the Adirondack Almanack, joins us Friday mornings with information about local outdoor and back country conditions.  Go to full article
Algae bloom. Photo: Lake George Waterkeeper
Algae bloom. Photo: Lake George Waterkeeper

Blue green algae may have caused fish kill in Lake Champlain

Blue-green algae blooms in Lake Champlain have intensified with late summer heat. Rouses Point, Missisquoi Bay, and North Beach in Burlington all issued warnings last week, and scientists say the algae blooms may have triggered a fish kill several weeks ago in Missisquoi Bay.  Go to full article

This weekend in the Adirondacks

John Warren, of the Adirondack Almanack, joins us Friday mornings with information about local outdoor and back country conditions.  Go to full article

This weekend in the Adirondacks

John Warren, of the Adirondack Almanack, joins us Friday mornings with information about local outdoor and backcountry conditions.  Go to full article
Apple orchard at harvest time. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/88499915@N00/">Winnie Au</a>, cc <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Apple orchard at harvest time. Photo: Winnie Au, cc some rights reserved

Defying weather, North Country apples thrive

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is predicting low yield for New York's apple crop, about half of last year. Growers blame the spring weather: It was unseasonably warm in March, and trees started to bud. In some areas, they bloomed. Then in April, temperatures dipped below freezing, killing the blossoms. It's the same story in many apple growing states, including Washington and Michigan.

NCPR has been checking in with Patricia Sheehan of Rulf's Orchard in Peru throughout the season. And when Julie Grant spoke with her this week, Sheehan had good news: Her trees, and many in the North Country, didn't bloom in March, and so weren't killed off in the April frost. Still, she says the dry summer has had an effect on the apples.  Go to full article
Black-and-Yellow Argiope (Argiope aurantia)  photo: Will Cook
Black-and-Yellow Argiope (Argiope aurantia) photo: Will Cook

Garden spider is intimidating, but a friend to gardeners

One of the largest and brightest spiders found in and around gardens in the North Country is the garden spider, also known as the black-and-yellow spider. They're big and kind of intimidating, but horticulturist Amy Ivy says they are harmless to humans and helpful to gardeners. She spoke with Todd Moe about garden variety spiders.  Go to full article

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