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News stories tagged with "summer"

This weekend in the Adirondacks

John Warren, of the Adirondack Almanack, joins us Friday mornings with information about local outdoor and back-country conditions.  Go to full article
The Palace Theater in Lake Placid, late on a Saturday night. Photos: Natasha Haverty
The Palace Theater in Lake Placid, late on a Saturday night. Photos: Natasha Haverty

The Last Picture Show? The future of small movie theaters in the North Country

The last decade or so, the North Country has seen a rebirth of its small-town movie theaters. Screens from Tupper Lake to Indian Lake to Ausable Forks have reopened. From Canton to Old Forge, small cinemas are often a big part of the local nightlife, offering a spark of light and glitz.

But the movie industry is changing, shifting fast from old-fashioned film projectors to new, high-tech digital systems. As Natasha Haverty reports, the price tag for that conversion is high and some North Country theater owners worry they might not survive the transition.  Go to full article
Kirk Sullivan, wearing a plaid shirt, says he feels at ease when he's shooting films. Photo provided by Kirk Sullivan
Kirk Sullivan, wearing a plaid shirt, says he feels at ease when he's shooting films. Photo provided by Kirk Sullivan

Filmmaker returns for a premiere in the Adirondacks

Adirondack native Kirk Sullivan will premiere his latest short film at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts this evening.

Sullivan's father, Fred, was also a filmmaker, known for The Beer Drinker's Guide to Fitness and Filmmaking and Cold River. He passed away unexpectedly in 1996. Kirk Sullivan, now 30, was born and raised in Saranac Lake and now lives in Los Angeles.

Tonight's film, The Come Up is a 10-minute short that Kirk Sullivan describes as a fun action-comedy. He wrapped up work on the film at the end of July. As Chris Morris reports, it takes place on the set of a major Hollywood producer, a familiar environment for filmmaker.  Go to full article
Yellowjacket. Photo: <a href-"http://www.flickr.com/photos/via/">Via Tsuji</a>, cc <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Yellowjacket. Photo: Via Tsuji, cc some rights reserved

In the garden: tomato troubles, yellowjackets, and more

Continuing hot, dry weather can lead to a range of challenges in the yard and garden. It's perfect weather for tomato troubles, including blossom end rot, early blight and septoria. Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy tells Martha Foley proper watering is the key to ending blossom end rot. She's also got a warning about stinging insects this time of year.  Go to full article

This weekend in the Adirondacks

John Warren, of the Adirondack Almanack, joins us Friday mornings with information about local outdoor and back-country conditions.  Go to full article
Spiny water flea. Photo: National Park Service
Spiny water flea. Photo: National Park Service

Lake George population complicates spiny water flea control

There's more bad news about an invasive species threatening the North Country's waterways.
With concern mounting over how to keep the spiny water flea from infesting Lake Champlain, New York environmental officials confirmed yesterday that the non-native organism has been confirmed in Lake George.

The tiny crustacean is known to edge out native species, while also fouling fishing gear. In a statement, DEC commissioner Joe Martens said "the discovery of spiny water flea in Lake George is not welcome news."  Go to full article
Spiny water flea. Photo: National Park Service
Spiny water flea. Photo: National Park Service

Lake George population complicates spiny water flea control

There's more bad news about an invasive species threatening the North Country's waterways.
With concern mounting over how to keep the spiny water flea from infesting Lake Champlain, New York environmental officials confirmed yesterday that the non-native organism has been confirmed in Lake George.

The tiny crustacean is known to edge out native species, while also fouling fishing gear. In a statement, DEC commissioner Joe Martens said "the discovery of spiny water flea in Lake George is not welcome news."  Go to full article
The St. Lawrence County Youth Bureau Program works with Cindy Quackenbush on the garden. Photo: Jasmine Wallace
The St. Lawrence County Youth Bureau Program works with Cindy Quackenbush on the garden. Photo: Jasmine Wallace

Garden welcomes butterflies and their hungry catepillars

Toward the end of her career as a schoolteacher, Cindy Quackenbush realized that the number of monarch butterflies in the area was dwindling. She decided her retirement project would be encouraging monarchs and other butterflies.

She's creating new habitats for the butterflies. One butterfly garden is taking shape in front of the new E.J. Noble Hospital Building in Canton.

Jasmine Wallace caught up with Cindy and the youth crew working on the garden.  Go to full article
Dr. Aileen O'Donoghue, St. Lawrence University
Dr. Aileen O'Donoghue, St. Lawrence University

In the night sky: stars, planets and a meteor shower

Astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue stopped by the studios this morning with an update on stars and planets to watch for this summer. Venus has risen in the morning sky. Mars, Saturn and Spica are near the horizon after sunset. And the Perseid meteor shower is on its way in the next two weeks.

O'Donoghue teaches physics at St. Lawrence University. She told Martha Foley she's also looking forward to the landing of NASA's "Curiosity" science lab on Mars August 6.  Go to full article
Matt Murray, (center, red T-shirt) brought more than 60 veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces and their family members to Lake Placid for a tour of the area's Olympic venues. Photo: Chris Morris, courtesy Adirondack Daily EnterpriseEnterprise
Matt Murray, (center, red T-shirt) brought more than 60 veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces and their family members to Lake Placid for a tour of the area's Olympic venues. Photo: Chris Morris, courtesy Adirondack Daily EnterpriseEnterprise

Boy Scout leads Lake Placid Olympic tour

A 16-year-old from the Troy area helped bring a group of more than 60 people, including Armed Services veterans and their families, to Lake Placid last week to tour Olympic sites and dine at the local American Legion hall.

Matt Murray, of Brunswick, is a junior at Tamarac High School and a member of Boy Scouts of America Troop 537. The Lake Placid trip was part of his Eagle Scout project, which he hopes to complete soon. Chris Morris caught up with the group and has our story.  Go to full article

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