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News stories tagged with "supreme-court"

Rally in New York City celebrating the Supreme Court's decision on the Defense of Marriage Act. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/eastsidephil/9148373602/sizes/z/in/photolist-eWpNKm-Db8w5-Db8wi-bVhBJy-eWjGQ4-eoikvV-dG6yJm-ajbZQb-6n7wPw-6nqY3h-6obUYx-9chSab-cEM45u/">Phil Davis NY</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Rally in New York City celebrating the Supreme Court's decision on the Defense of Marriage Act. Photo: Phil Davis NY, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Cuomo praises SCOTUS decisions on same-sex marriage

There have been large, daylong celebrations in Los Angeles and San Francisco by supporters of same-sex marriages over the last day. They're cheering a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that settles a five-year battle against California's ban on same-sex marriage. The ruling means gay couples can start picking up wedding licenses in about three weeks.

There was a similar celebration in New York City last night over a second ruling by the court that overturned a key provision of the Defense of Marriage Act. Kitty Lambert Rudd, a longtime Buffalo gay rights activist, was elated yesterday.

Lambert Rudd is President of OUTspoken for Equality. She and her partner were one of the first local couples to marry two years ago after New York State legalized same-sex marriage.  Go to full article

Most NY leaders hail health care ruling

New York's politicians and major health care providers are applauding the Supreme Court's decision to uphold President Obama's health care law. Meanwhile, an Albany Law School expert says Chief Justice John Roberts may have been concerned about his legacy, and that was a factor in his decision. Karen DeWitt has more.  Go to full article
Jon Kovecses and Eva Redwanly
Jon Kovecses and Eva Redwanly

For Quebec's common law couples, an uncertain future

Here in New York, debate over same-sex marriage has existed for the last few years. But just across the border in Quebec, the big issue is that a lot of couples never marry at all. One third of Quebecois couples have de facto, or common law, partnerships. They live together, join their finances and have families without getting married. That's different than in the U.S., where common law relationships are fairly rare. And now, a case now making its way through the courts may change the rules for millions of unmarried Quebecois couples. Sarah Harris has more.  Go to full article
Protestors outside the state house
Protestors outside the state house

Vermonters protest Citizens United, call for constitutional amendment

Saturday marked the two-year anniversary of the supreme court Citizens United decision. The court voted 5-4, saying that corporations have the same protected speech rights as people, including the right to make unlimited financial contributions to groups who want to influence elections. That's upsetting to a lot of Vermonters. And as Sarah Harris reports, they're working to change it.  Go to full article

High court ruling could impact Bruno's sentence

A decision by the US Supreme Court Thursday could impact the prison sentence for New York's former State Senate Majority Leader, Joe Bruno. Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article

Schumer defends Sotomayor

Supreme Court nominee, Sonia Sotomayor, faces a second day of questions at a Senate hearing today. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

Alito Hearing Focus

The confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito move into the question phase today. Alito is virtually guaranteed a tough grilling. In opening statements yesterday, Democrats made it clear they'll quiz him about abortion and presidential power. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

Democrats Ready to Question Supreme Court Nominee Miers

Some Democrats aren't willing to give Harriet Miers a quick go-ahead to sit on the Supreme Court. The top Democrat on the Senate judiciary committee, Vermont's Patrick Leahy, says Miers was not on the list of acceptable nominees he gave to the White House, and he doubts Miers could be confirmed as quickly as Republicans hope. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

News Analysis: Senate's Rural Bent Aids Roberts' Confirmation

Senators Chuck Schumer from New York and Patrick Leahy from Vermont, both Democrats, have taken leading rolls this week in the John Roberts confirmation hearings. Despite their reservations, it's considered a foregone conclusion that the Senate will approve Roberts as the next Chief Justice. Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann has been working this year on a special project, studying the influence of rural America on national politics. In this morning's news analysis, Brian says the outcome of the Roberts confirmation is shaped to a surprising degree by a rural bias hardwired into the Senate's composition.
     Welcome to the Homeland Brian Mann's book on rural American politics will be published next year by Steerforth Press.  Go to full article

Court-Testing the Death Penalty

New York's highest court heard the first test of the 1995 death penalty statute in an over six-hour marathon of court arguments yesterday. Karen Dewitt reports.  Go to full article

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