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News stories tagged with "syrup"

Josh Parker stands next to his pellet-fired evaporator at his sugar shack near Canton. Photo: Todd Moe
Josh Parker stands next to his pellet-fired evaporator at his sugar shack near Canton. Photo: Todd Moe

Canton teen is young maple syrup entrepreneur

Joshua Parker doesn't have his driver's license yet, but he's a young maple syrup entrepreneur with big plans. At 16, he's one of the country's youngest maple producers.

Joshua catches rides with his dad and neighbors to check the taps in his sugar bush. And even though he relies on advice from more experienced maple producers, he's the boss and owner of Parker Maple Farm, near Canton. Five years ago, he started tapping sap with 10 buckets, as a hobby. Last year, he got serious and installed a tubing system with 3,500 taps. He created a business plan, borrowed money for state-of-the-art equipment (with help from his parents) and is waiting for the sap to start flowing.  Go to full article
Mike Farrell, director of Cornell's Uihlein Forest, in the sugar shack at the maple syrup research station near Lake Placid.   The evaporator is able to process about 25 gallons of syrup an hour.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Mike Farrell, director of Cornell's Uihlein Forest, in the sugar shack at the maple syrup research station near Lake Placid. The evaporator is able to process about 25 gallons of syrup an hour. Photo: Todd Moe

Why maple syrup matters: from tree to tap to market

With the start of the traditional maple sugaring season just weeks away, Todd Moe talks with Mike Farrell, director of Cornell's maple research field station near Lake Placid.

He's written a new book, The Sugarmaker's Companion, which explores tapping trees for sap, marketing maple syrup and the economics of sugaring.  Go to full article
Hugh Newton inspects a vacuum pump system in his sugarbush near Parishville.
Hugh Newton inspects a vacuum pump system in his sugarbush near Parishville.

Maple syrup: a mud season harvest

The pails are up and the sap is flowing. Weather plays a large part in the making of maple syrup. Last year's early spring ended the syrup production season abruptly in some parts of the state. Entering this year's maple syrup season, which usually runs from early March to mid-April, maple producers are eager to put last year behind them. Todd Moe spoke with a couple of syrup producers who say conditions are ideal for the start of the North Country's sweetest season.  Go to full article
One of the 5,500 sap buckets at Yancey's Sugarbush near Croghan.
One of the 5,500 sap buckets at Yancey's Sugarbush near Croghan.

Gearing up for another season of sap

It's only a couple of weeks until the sap starts flowing from maple trees across the North Country. And maple producers are getting ready. Todd Moe talks with a fifth generation maple producer in Lewis County.  Go to full article
Maple syrup producer Charlie Rutley with his new evaporator at his sugar shack near Potsdam.
Maple syrup producer Charlie Rutley with his new evaporator at his sugar shack near Potsdam.

Preview: Maple Weekend

Maple syrup producers across the North Country are hoping temperatures might rise enough today or Saturday for the sap to start or continue running. The season is nearly two weeks late in some parts of New York and Vermont. The late season isn't unusual but some producers fear it could decrease the number of sugaring days. Ideal weather for sugaring is temperatures in the 40s during the day and the 20s at night. This weekend, producers will open their sugar houses to the public whether they have sap to boil or not. Todd Moe reports.  Go to full article

2nd Sap Run May Salvage Syrup Season

Yesterday's warm temperatures induced a late run of sap in the maple trees of northern New York and Vermont. The second run may save a strange season that maple syrup producers feared was going to be a disaster. But as David Sommerstein reports, tappers further South weren't so lucky.  Go to full article

Maple Syrup Producers to Gather in Verona Next Month

A chartered bus will take some 50 St. Lawrence County residents to the New York State Maple Producer's Conference in mid-January. Jody Tosti reports.  Go to full article

Maple Syrup Season: Quality Excellent

A tenacious winter is slowing the progress of Vermont's maple sugar season. But sugar makers say while the quantities have been small so far, the quality has been excellent. They're looking forward to forecasts this week with temperatures below freezing at night and above 40 during the day—ideal sap producing conditions. One St. Lawrence county maple sugar producer says, despite a late spring, the syrup season is going just fine. John Scarlett is a blacksmith in Rossie who also makes maple syrup each spring. He told Todd Moe the maple season can vary greatly within the same region.  Go to full article

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