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News stories tagged with "tauny"

Ray with one of his favorite lures made by the C.W. Lane Manufacturing Company in Madrid, NY. Photo: Todd Moe
Ray with one of his favorite lures made by the C.W. Lane Manufacturing Company in Madrid, NY. Photo: Todd Moe

In Canton, North Country-made antique fishing lures on display

Just in time for fishing season, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York is celebrating the art of antique hand-made fishing lures. In the 19th and early 20th century, anglers were able to purchase lures manufactured in small shops in communities from Old Forge to Lake Clear to Clayton.

Norwood collector Ray Bartholomew grew up fishing in Jefferson County and has been collecting old-time fishing tackle for more than 30 years. Some of his favorites will be on display at TAUNY in Canton starting this Saturday. Todd Moe spoke with Bartholomew about his passion for antique fishing equipment and research into some of the North Country's finest lure artisans.  Go to full article
Singer, songwriter, and banjo player Camilla Ammirati will help celebrate the re-opening of The TAUNY Center in Canton Friday, from 5 to 7 p.m.  Photo:  Susanna Rosen
Singer, songwriter, and banjo player Camilla Ammirati will help celebrate the re-opening of The TAUNY Center in Canton Friday, from 5 to 7 p.m. Photo: Susanna Rosen

TAUNY opens a new season with old-timey music

Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, TAUNY, celebrates the start of a new season of exhibits and programs this weekend. You're invited to stop by TAUNY on Friday night for a kick-off event that will include new and old-time music.

Singer/songwriter and banjo player Camilla Ammirati joined Todd Moe in the studio for her brand of bluegrass and swing music and a preview of TAUNY's upcoming season.  Go to full article
Alan Lomax, in Dominica, in 1962. Photo courtesy Lomax Archive.
Alan Lomax, in Dominica, in 1962. Photo courtesy Lomax Archive.

Lomax musical archive, digitized, visits the North Country

For some 60 years, Alan Lomax lugged recording equipment around the United States and to many countries around the world to document everyday people's music.

The Lomax archive of folk music and its tens of thousands of recordings have been digitized and are now available free to anyone who has access to the Internet.

A series of events this weekend in Canton and Potsdam celebrates the Lomax collection. It includes films, lectures, and a musical presentation tomorrow at 7 pm at the TAUNY Center in Canton by the curator of the Alan Lomax Archive, Nathan Salsburg.

Salsburg told David Sommerstein it's in part the informal nature of the recordings that makes them so special and unique.  Go to full article
Students held an impromptu service to honor the Gunnison Memorial Chapel on Monday. Photo: Zach Hirsch.
Students held an impromptu service to honor the Gunnison Memorial Chapel on Monday. Photo: Zach Hirsch.

TAUNY to award Gunnison bell ringers

On Sunday, TAUNY will be holding its 21st annual Salute to North Country Legends at the Best Western in Canton. One of the three groups that will receive an award is the Gunnison Memorial Chapel Bell Ringers.

TAUNY had already chosen the bell ringers, before the recent fire that burned the Gunnison spire. Here's TAUNY's Varick Chittenden, offering a little insight into how the organization came to its decision. He's speaking with Zach Hirsch at an impromptu gathering on Monday, where students in the background rang their mini-cowbells in honor of the chapel.  Go to full article
Since the 1860's, the Wadhams United Church of Christ has served strawberries with all the fixin's. Photo: Martha Cooper/TAUNY Archives
Since the 1860's, the Wadhams United Church of Christ has served strawberries with all the fixin's. Photo: Martha Cooper/TAUNY Archives

Serving up strawberry shortcake for generations in Wadhams

They've been serving strawberry shortcake every summer in a small Champlain Valley community since the end of the Civil War. And later this month, TAUNY will honor the Wadhams United Church of Christ with a North Country Heritage Award. Each June in the small Essex County community, hundreds gather to enjoy strawberry shortcake, music and festivities. It's been an important local tradition for 147 years. Back in 1866, a dish of fresh strawberries, cake and ice cream cost fifteen cents.

Todd Moe talks with long-time Strawberry Festival volunteer Evelyn Brant. She's 87 and has volunteered at the festival since 1946. This year, four generations of her family helped with the event.  Go to full article
Marjorie Lansing Porter.  Photo: TAUNY
Marjorie Lansing Porter. Photo: TAUNY

Saving the long-forgotten songs of the North Country

Traditional Arts in Upstate New York is spearheading a collaboration on a ground-breaking project to showcase and raise awareness of the folk music of the Adirondack North Country. Todd Moe talks with TAUNY director Jill Breit about the "Songs to Keep" project, and Champlain Valley historian Marjorie Lansing Porter's work to preserve the music of lumber camps and iron mines.  Go to full article
Dan Berggren.  Photo: TAUNY
Dan Berggren. Photo: TAUNY

Preview: Dan Berggren at TAUNY

Singer-songwriter Dan Berggren shares new music from his latest CD, Tongues in Trees, at TAUNY in Canton on Saturday night (7 pm). The new recording marks Berggren's 40th year as an award-winning musician. His songs explore the many dimensions of home, hard working folks, taking care of the planet and each other.

Berggren's musical career began in 1973 while serving in the army based in Germany. He told Todd Moe he was hired by Air Canada to be a troubadour, traveling around Germany singing American folksongs.  Go to full article
<i>Maple tapping in the early spring</i>, butternut, Tom Cote. Photo:  Todd Moe
Maple tapping in the early spring, butternut, Tom Cote. Photo: Todd Moe

Artists who look to the forest for ideas, inspiration

Considered America's oldest working woodlands, the Northern Forest -- stretching from the Tug Hill through the Adirondacks to the coast of Maine -- is also home to a remarkable range of traditional artists. This month, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, opened a new exhibit that features art from among the trees.

TAUNY executive director Jill Breit says the concept behind Artists of the Forest is to showcase how artists are using the resources that are growing around them in the woods. The pieces featured in the show come from northern New York, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine.  Go to full article
TAUNY Executive Director Jill Breit at the TAUNY Center's Folk Store in Canton. Photo: Nora Flaherty
TAUNY Executive Director Jill Breit at the TAUNY Center's Folk Store in Canton. Photo: Nora Flaherty

How the North Country can support artists, grow economy

The North Country's Regional Economic Development Council has been one of the most successful in the state. It's received top awards twice now, for projects that range from renovating an historic building in Port Henry, to making improvements to the Wild Center in Tupper Lake, to treating wastewater in Malone.

Several of the projects the state funded aim to improve the North Country's economic outlook through the arts. One of these is "Invisible Factory", a project whose goal is to support regional artisans, and help them make a living from what they do.

"Invisible Factory" is a partnership between Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, in Canton, and the Adirondack North Country Association, in Saranac Lake.

Nora Flaherty stopped by TAUNY, to learn more about Invisible Factory.  Go to full article
The Tuesday Morning Knitting Group in Canton.  Photo: Todd Moe
The Tuesday Morning Knitting Group in Canton. Photo: Todd Moe

Swapping stories, stitches on a winter day

It's a natural fit on a cold winter day - working with wool yarn to knit a hat, socks or a sweater. But it probably comes as no surprise that for avid knitters, it's a year-round passion. Todd Moe stopped by Traditional Arts in Upstate New York in Canton last winter to visit a weekly knitting group. There are dozens of similar clubs around the region that meet at craft shops, bookstores, churches and living rooms.

Socially-minded knitters donate their creations to charitable projects, experienced knitters work on larger projects or enter contests and then there are those who just knit.

This month, the knitters are meeting at the Brewer Bookstore, as TAUNY prepares its new exhibit. So, on Tuesday mornings you'll find just a couple of knitters or a group as large as twenty sitting in a circle surrounded by skeins of yarn, half-finished sweaters and a spirit of generosity.  Go to full article

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