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News stories tagged with "tauny"

Meet the Masters: La Famille Ouimet, French American Traditions

The Ouimet family see themselves as preservers of a number of vanishing traditions. They play traditional music in the French American ethnic tradition, and they pass the music on within the family, performing as a family band. Old-style Quebecois rugmaking is among the other talents of this Valley Falls family.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Brier Hill Volunteer F.D. Bullhead Feed

The Brier Hill Volunteer Fire Department continues one of the region's oldest community suppers--a bullhead feed. Begun in 1937 as a fundraiser, the bullhead feed is a community-wide social event, with nearly 1000 meals served. An informal master-apprentice system prepares young cooks, who are trusted with the well-guarded "secret recipe" for this regional specialty.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Don Woodcock, Champion Fiddler

Don Woodcock, a dairyman from Kendrew Corners won the New York Fiddling Championship so often, he was declared grand champion and asked to retire from the competition. He began playing by accompanying his father on piano, and later taught himself a variety of traditional fiddle and dance styles.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Edith Cutting, Folklore Collector, Westport

Edith E. Cutting--teacher, author and folklorist--was born in the Essex County town of Lewis, on a small family farm. Encouraged by her college mentor, she interviewed her friends and families and collected examples of their old customs, stories and sayings. Her first collection was published in 1944 as Lore of an Adirondack County.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Ham Ferry, Storyteller, Seveys Corners

Ham Ferry earned the reputation of being an authentic Adirondacker and a consummate storyteller. Ham's Inn, a small bar located at Sevey's Corners near Childwold, was Ferry's natural setting and the spot where he held listeners rapt for hours on end. Much of the material for Ham Ferry's stories came from his life as a woodsman, lumberman, and a wilderness guide.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Mohawk Choir of St. Regis

Catholicism has its roots deeps in the history of Akwesasne, the St. Regis Mohawk reservation straddling the St. Lawrence River between the US and Canada, going back to the French Jesuit mission established there in the 1750s. The church choir there preserves a unique tradition of Christian music sung in the Mohawk language, and acts as a bridge between two often discordant cultural traditions.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Clarence "Daddy Dick" Richards, Country Music Pioneer, Lake Luzerne

By the age of twelve, Clarence Richards was playing fiddle for local dances in the Corinth area of Saratoga County and substituting for the caller when necessary. Early in his music career, he lost his left hand in a paper mill accident, but within six months he had discovered a way to continue playing. "Daddy Dick" was an early entertainer on Radio WGY in Schenectady. He has performed with many prominent country and bluegrass music stars.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Veronica Terrillion, Sculptor, Indian River

Beginning in 1954 with a roadside statue of the Virgin Mary, Veronica Terrillion has created a remarkable thing, a total environment of sculpture on her three-acre homestead in Lewis County. Over 400 images include animals (zebra, deer), religious images (a nativity scene and St. Francis of Assisi), and representations of her family members.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Saranac Lake Winter Carnival

First celebrated in 1897 as a diversion for tuberculosis patients taking the mountain air "cure," the Saranac Lake Winter Festival includes the construction of an elaborate ice palace, races, snow sculpture, concerts, dinners, dancing, the crowning of royalty and a fireworks display.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Bill Massey, Decoy Carver, Waddington

Bill Massey was one of the last of the traditional St. Lawrence River guides and decoy makers. For more than 70 years, Massey carved countless decoys, both for hunting and for prized decorations. He used no photographs as models; instead he relied on his vast knowledge of St. Lawrence River birds, gained through first-hand contact.  Go to full article

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