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News stories tagged with "taxes"

How will Gov. Cuomo's new budget plan actually impact how much property tax New Yorkers pay? Well, it's complicated. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/59937401@N07/5856941321/in/photolist-9VymAV-9Vynke-2SgvEj-a6nVRn-4QuRpr-dQ6vfn-cssr8b-6KSFLB-2pgAY9-88cmk-88cnD-ifXYRG-bmsT4u-9VB9gG-9Vyij6-pK5TN-7VHGAR-bGi9gP-bGi9vB-bGi9pi-bGi9Kg-5CLWT3-bvn9BA-bvn9FG-bvn9DU-bJgWcn-bJgWeD-bvn9CY-4qLQnz-StQqv-4iHTRm-8Sb3VN-6Rfw6N-7xBoCa-bvhFtG-8jpqA5-rCBfK-azfJfM-ezXUkt-67UDHm-5ehLEB-79H6wC-5M1Cx-9Q2Eyr-5ADaAn-25GFHk-4v73Jz-7a6Ngu-7a6Ncu-7a2Y96-8tmkyP">Images Money</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
How will Gov. Cuomo's new budget plan actually impact how much property tax New Yorkers pay? Well, it's complicated. Photo: Images Money, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Cuomo's plan to freeze local property taxes has lawmakers confused

The legislature has finished its hearings on Governor Cuomo's budget proposal, and legislators will start crafting a spending plan once they return from the President's Day break. One of the final hearings focused on the governor's tax cutting plans, and lawmakers had plenty of questions, especially about his plan to freeze local property taxes. Legislators at the hearing quizzed Governor Cuomo's tax commissioner on that plan. Tax Commissioner Thomas Mattox admits it's complex.  Go to full article
NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio and Gov. Cuomo, pictured here at a recent event in Albany, are at odds over competing plans to fund pre-K programs. Photo: Gov. Cuomo's office
NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio and Gov. Cuomo, pictured here at a recent event in Albany, are at odds over competing plans to fund pre-K programs. Photo: Gov. Cuomo's office

Pre-K funding fight fuels upstate-downstate divide

Governor Cuomo seems to have gained the upper hand and some new allies in his policy skirmish with New York City Mayor Bill deBlasio over how to fund pre kindergarten, as the fight threatens to turn into an upstate downstate split.  Go to full article
New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's plan to fund universal pre-kindergarten is at odds with a plan that Gov. Andrew Cuomo is advancing. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/kevdia/10632385465/sizes/z/in/photolist-hcxKLM-bbqMye-bbqMDi-fTHQXW-bbqGNa-bbqL8k-bbqDTP-bbqEox-9Eyofy-9h2BLc-bbqKMZ-9h5sB7-9h5s4w-9y7fQR-9h5t1o-9h5vju-9h2mje-bbqF4k-bbqFkK-9h5vvh-9h2jSn-9y7gji-9h5ta5-bbqKuR-9Evtzz-9h5KcE-9EynuC-bbqJpV-9h2kkt-9h2nDB-9h5vNL-bbqJXT-9EynTs-9Eynbm-9Eynjj-9EvsUn-9h5vYW-9h5w5Y-bbqHfP-9Evtgz-iSdGEw-2k2kQf-7Vf85R-7Vinyo-7V5Ugj-7V2EtZ-eYXAVT-bbqJ14/">Kevin Case</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's plan to fund universal pre-kindergarten is at odds with a plan that Gov. Andrew Cuomo is advancing. Photo: Kevin Case, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

New York state battles over universal pre-K funding

The debate over universal pre-kindergarten shows no signs of slowing down at the Capitol. New York City's Democratic mayor, Bill de Blasio, isn't backing down from his plan to tax the wealthy to pay for pre-K, while upstate and suburban Republicans in the State Senate say they will block a vote on the tax proposal.

Meanwhile, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is advancing a plan to fund universal pre-K in the state using "existing state funds" over the next five years, and a new poll from Quinnipiac University says Cuomo's plan is more popular with a majority of New Yorkers.  Go to full article
NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio and Gov. Cuomo have competing plans to fund pre-K programs. Photo: Office of the NY Governor
NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio and Gov. Cuomo have competing plans to fund pre-K programs. Photo: Office of the NY Governor

Poll: Pre-K tax hike not as popular as NY funds

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) A new poll finds more support among New York City voters for Gov. Andrew Cuomo's plan to pay for prekindergarten with existing state funds than Mayor Bill de Blasio's proposal for a tax increase.

A Quinnipiac University poll finds 49 percent of voters support funding pre-K without raising taxes versus 40 percent who favor de Blasio's proposed tax hike on wealthier city residents. Voters statewide supported using existing state funds over a city tax increase, 47 percent to 37 percent.  Go to full article
Gov. Andrew Cuomo. Photo: Karen DeWitt.
Gov. Andrew Cuomo. Photo: Karen DeWitt.

Cuomo: Local minimum wages would disrupt economy

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) Gov. Andrew Cuomo is opposed to letting individual municipalities set their own minimum wages and tax rates, as New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio wants to do.

Cuomo says "we don't want to have different cities with different tax rates" or different wage laws competing among each other for business because it could "cannibalize" the state economy.  Go to full article
At a pre-K program in New York City. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/10485077@N06/3799027263/">edenpictures</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
At a pre-K program in New York City. Photo: edenpictures, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

NY Senate leaders divided over pre-k, NYC tax

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) The state Senate's leaders are split, like Gov. Andrew Cuomo and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, over funding universal pre-kindergarten with income taxes on the city's wealthy.

Republican Sen. Dean Skelos, co-leader of the Senate's majority coalition, is siding with Cuomo against the tax.

Democratic Sen. Jeff Klein, the coalition's other co-leader, is backing de Blasio.  Go to full article
Potsdam Mayor Steve Yugartis. Photo courtesy Steve Yugartis.
Potsdam Mayor Steve Yugartis. Photo courtesy Steve Yugartis.

Is Cuomo taking power away from local government?

Steve Yurgartis has been mayor of the Village of Potsdam for two years. He calls the governor's strategy for government consolidation outlined in his budget address "meddling," and he's worried about the state-local balance of power.

Yurgartis talked at length with Martha Foley shortly after Gov. Cuomo delivered his budget address. Yurgartis says the governor is right when he argues that when people complain about taxes, they complain most loudly about property taxes, But he says it comes down to an underlying trend that's led to an over-dependence on local property taxes, for all kinds of state-mandated costs.

(note: there's no transcript of their conversation. Hear the full audio above.)  Go to full article
Empire Plaza in Albany.
Empire Plaza in Albany.

New laws bring change in 2014

A number of new laws will take effect in New York in the New Year.

Hitting the books in the new year are the first of three new tax cuts for small businesses and an additional near 10-percent tax cut for manufacturers. Middle income families are also getting tax relief in 2014. That affects people who make between $40,000 and $300,000 and you have to have at least one dependent child.  Go to full article
Albany, NY. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/dougtone/7031756383/">Doug Kerr</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Albany, NY. Photo: Doug Kerr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Taxes to be major topic in 2014

One of the top issues of the 2014 legislative session will be taxes. While Governor Cuomo wants to cut taxes, some, including New York City Mayor elect Bill de Blasio, want to raise them.  Go to full article
An Amish farm in St. Lawrence county. Photo: Sarah Harris
An Amish farm in St. Lawrence county. Photo: Sarah Harris

Why more Amish aren't registering for the STAR exemption, and how it's getting fixed

New York state is urging people to re-register for their STAR property tax exemption before the deadline of December 31. Even if you've done it before, you need to sign up again - it's part of an effort by the state to curb fraud.

You can register online or by phone (here's how), but what if you don't have a computer or a phone? What if, say, you're Amish?  Go to full article

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