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News stories tagged with "technology"

Crescent moon in twilight. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpstanley/423720850/">Jeremy Stanley</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Crescent moon in twilight. Photo: Jeremy Stanley, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Clear skies, longer nights offer great star-gazing

The days are getting shorter, by about three minutes every 24 hours now, and that's welcome news for Aileen O'Donoghue. It means more time for looking at the night sky.

O'Donoghue teaches physics, including astronomy, at St. Lawrence University, and stopped by the NCPR studios this morning to deliver an update on the current highlights in what she calls the wilderness above us.

She tells Martha Foley about Venus (hanging in the west at sundown), Saturn (nearby, but fainter and MUCH farther away), and the waning crescent, and Jupiter (both in the morning sky). And then there's the new crescent, coming Monday.  Go to full article

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UW researcher Andrea Stocco during the experiment. Photo: University of Washington
UW researcher Andrea Stocco during the experiment. Photo: University of Washington

Brain to brain communication, via the Internet

We've used the internet to connect computers. Now, how about using it to connect our brains? Researchers at the University of Washington have done just that in what they say is the first ever brain-to-brain interface.  Go to full article
Cows grazing at Bob Zufall's farm in Lisbon, NY. Photo: David Pynchon
Cows grazing at Bob Zufall's farm in Lisbon, NY. Photo: David Pynchon

Two farms, two very different views on sustainability

The term sustainability is now commonplace. Everything from furniture, to travel, to shopping at Walmart is described as "sustainable." Usage has stretched so far that it's hard to say what "sustainability" really is.

Dictionary.com defines sustainability as "supporting long term ecological balance." And Wikipedia says it is "the capacity to endure." We visited two North Country dairy farms, each with a very different philosophy, but both claiming to be sustainable.  Go to full article
Terra cotta architectural design. Photo: Ashley Hitzel/WBFO
Terra cotta architectural design. Photo: Ashley Hitzel/WBFO

Tech gives terra cotta facades a facelift

Upstate New York is loaded with beautiful architectural treasures, most of them from the 19th and 20th century. And many of them need a facelift. A long-running western New York business is creating terra-cotta architectural features with the help of the latest technology. The Innovation Trail's Ashley Hirtzel reports from Buffalo.  Go to full article
Les and Erica Goodman. Photo: Sarah Harris
Les and Erica Goodman. Photo: Sarah Harris

From milk to beer: Dairy family switches to hops

Agriculture in the North Country is changing - and the evidence is everywhere. For the Goodmans, a longtime dairy family in Fort Ann, in Washington County, it's time to get out of the business. But Erica and Les Goodman are trying something new on their land: growing hops. And they're using social media to do it.  Go to full article
The U.S. Salt plant, owned by Inergy. Salt is currently mined here, and the caverns from previous mining are where Inergy wants to store gas and LPG's (propane and butane.) Photo: David Chanatry
The U.S. Salt plant, owned by Inergy. Salt is currently mined here, and the caverns from previous mining are where Inergy wants to store gas and LPG's (propane and butane.) Photo: David Chanatry

Are the Finger Lakes the place to store natural gas?

It's something few people think about, but all the natural gas and other fossil fuels being produced by hydrofracking have to be stored somewhere before they get to the consumer. Often used for the job: underground salt caverns like the ones near Watkins Glen in the Finger Lakes.

Now an out-of-state company wants to expand storage there, a plan some local residents call risky.  Go to full article
Instructions for 'CrowdHydrology.' Photo: Ashley Hassett
Instructions for 'CrowdHydrology.' Photo: Ashley Hassett

Buffalo-based project crowdsources water level tracking

A nationwide project based in New York is using crowd sourcing to gather up-to-date information on water levels.

The program's a partnership between the US Geological Service and the University of Buffalo. It's proving more and more useful at the USGS cuts back on the number of water monitoring stations across the country.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href=http://www.flickr.com/photos/67272961@N03/6123892769/">jfcherry</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: jfcherry, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

NY closer to online patient access

The state is one step closer to giving patients access to their medical information online. The e-Health Collaborative has announced nine finalists in their competition to design an online patient portal.  Go to full article
Wireless broadband internet router. Photo: <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USI_router.jpg">Bobamnertiopsis</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Wireless broadband internet router. Photo: Bobamnertiopsis, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Adk town tries "white space" approach to broadband

New York state and private companies investing tens of millions of dollars in the North Country in an effort to bring broadband internet connections to some of the region's most remote, rural areas.

In March, the state announced that $200,000 will go to the town of Thurman in Warren County to help develop a kind of far-reaching wi-fi connection known as "white space."

Evelyn Wood, town supervisor in Thurman, and David Salway, head of New York's Broadband Program Office, appeared yesterday on the public radio program Capitol Pressroom to talk about the project.

They spoke with host Curtis Schick.  Go to full article

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