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News stories tagged with "technology"

Light Pollution: Taking Back the Night Sky

The invention of electric lights at the end of the 19th Century ended the ancient tyranny of darkness over our lives. Turning on the lights at night has allowed us to make every hour count. But while nighttime lighting has given us unprecedented security and uncountable opportunities, we may be reaching the point where we have too much of a good thing. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Ed Janus reports on two people involved in an international effort to turn the lights down a little and take back the night.  Go to full article

Bacteria Could Power Environmental Monitoring Equipment

Bacteria that can eat pollution and generate electricity at the same time. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports.  Go to full article

Recycling Computers

As older computers become obsolete, we're faced with a dilemma: what to do with the out-of-date equipment? The problem will only grow as personal computers become a stock item in more and more households. But so far, the manufacturers, the recycling industry, and the government don't have a plan in place to deal with the old equipment. That's a problem because some of that equipment contains lead, mercury, and other toxic materials that can cause damage to the environment and people's health. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports.  Go to full article

North Country Consortium Puts Technology Into Schools and Libraries

Five years ago, with help from a federal grant, the North Country Consortium began installing new computers and Internet access in more than a dozen schools and libraries in Jefferson and Lewis counties. This year, the Consortium received the final portion of the million-dollar grant. As Jody Tosti reports, the money will provide training to help teachers and librarians make the most of the new technology.  Go to full article

Job Skills: Math, Science and Computer Literacy

Literacy is the ability to read and write at a certain level of proficiency. But, increasingly it has become common to attach the word to the subjects of math, science and even computers. As our series on literacy in the North Country concludes today, we look at how employers are coping with the increasing demands for a more technologically skilled workforce and how the gap in skills affects the northern New York economy. Jody Tosti has our story.

Clinton County Literacy Volunteers (518) 564-5332
One-Stop Career Center, St. Lawrence County (315) 386-3276  Go to full article

Physicians Say Global Warming Threatens Public Health

Some physicians are concerned about the United States not attending the final talks on the Kyoto Protocol on global warming held in early November. The physicians say global warming is already a problem and is adding to a number of public health threats. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports.  Go to full article

School Finds New Way to Recycle Tires

Great Lakes residents use more than two million tires a year, and many of them end up in a landfill. But one Illinois school has found an unusual way to use some of those tires. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Chris Lehman has more.  Go to full article

Visitors: Carolyn Raffenberger, "Precautionary" Environmentalist

David Sommerstein talks to Carolyn Raffenberger about the "precautionary principle". It says we should look into environmental and health effects before we leap into advances in science and technology.  Go to full article

Don't Applaud?Just Throw Rotten Tomatoes

From designing a better can opener to building more fuel efficient cars, engineering takes the theories of science and applies them to real life. But teachers of engineering often struggle to bring real-life lessons to the classroom. A class at SUNY Canton gives high school students a chance to grapple with real engineering problems, but with a seasonal twist. Students have to design and build a catapult to launch rotten tomatoes the furthest. David Sommerstein went to see the homemade catapults in action.  Go to full article

EPA Rethinks Post-Terror Removal of Environmental Data from Websites

Following the terrorist attacks on September 11, the federal government has been re-thinking its website policies. Anything that the government feels could be used by terrorists was removed from the Internet. Now, the EPA is considering putting back some information about the risks communities face because of nearby industrial plants. But some industry groups were glad to see the information removed and don't want it put back on the internet. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports.  Go to full article

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