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News stories tagged with "teens"

"From the Top" is heard Sunday at 4pm on NCPR.
"From the Top" is heard Sunday at 4pm on NCPR.

"From the Top" in Potsdam to showcase young musicians

One of the most popular weekly music programs on public radio is coming to Potsdam this Saturday night. For more than ten years, "From the Top" has been the preeminent showcase for America's best young musicians. Hosted by pianist Christopher O'Riley, the show will be recorded live in Hosmer Concert Hall at SUNY Potsdam's Crane School of Music on Saturday night (7:30). The Potsdam "From the Top" broadcast will feature several of the most talented young performers from across the country. The show is the final Community Performance Series Guest Artist Series event of the season.

These are tough times for classical music -- with recent budget cuts to arts education in public schools and some orchestras going bankrupt. But Christopher O'Riley told Todd Moe that he doesn't think the future of classical music is bleak. He says the next generation of classical musicians are more entrepreneurial than his generation.  Go to full article

Magic, charm in new teen novel

Many of us read The Secret Garden when we were kids. Children's author Ellen Potter takes that story and sets it in the Thousand Islands in her new book The Humming Room. Her characters live in an old children's sanatorium on an island the locals call "Cough Rock." Our book reviewer Betsy Kepes spoke with Ellen Potter about her latest novel.  Go to full article
Morgan Kelly (left) from Saranac High School and Assemblywoman Janet Duprey with delegates from Clinton and Essex county high schools
Morgan Kelly (left) from Saranac High School and Assemblywoman Janet Duprey with delegates from Clinton and Essex county high schools

Students gather to meet lawmakers, talk politics

NCPR kicked off election coverage with a series of stories this week. See below for more on the 23rd district race for the House of Representatives.

Politics are everywhere these days, from the bitter Republican primary fight that's playing out on our TV screens to the redistricting battle in Albany that could shake up politics right here in our own backyard. As 2012 goes on, the news and conversation will only get louder and more intense.

Most high school students can't vote, but politics plays a big role in their lives, too. And they're paying attention, at least the teens are who gathered recently in Peru to talk about government and politics. Our correspondent Sarah Harris sends this report.  Go to full article

State Medicaid cuts hit teen health program

Planned Parenthood of the North Country is closing down its teen pregnancy and parenting program after New York cut the program's in its effort to trim statewide Medicaid expenses.  Go to full article
Sackets Harbor students wear makeup, costumes and dance to "Thriller" in a parking lot performance.
Sackets Harbor students wear makeup, costumes and dance to "Thriller" in a parking lot performance.

Using music, dance to fight bullying

Over the last few months, a new music and dance club at Sackets Harbor High School has grown from a few students to more than 30. The Glee Club focuses mostly on music, but there's an anti-bullying message, too.

Joanne Heaslip is the leader of Sackets Harbor's Parent Teacher Organization and manager of the Glee Club. She's hoping the arts and music will build self-confidence in students. The TV show Glee has made the club popular and even students from other districts have joined.

Heaslip told Todd Moe that Thursday night rehearsals are fun, but she wants the experience to help students who sometimes feel bullied in school to build self-respect and confidence. For more information about Sackets Harbor's Glee Club: slips824@yahoo.com  Go to full article
Sackets Harbor students wear makeup, costumes and dance to "Thriller" in a parking lot performance.
Sackets Harbor students wear makeup, costumes and dance to "Thriller" in a parking lot performance.

Using music, dance to fight bullying

Over the last few months, a new music and dance club at Sackets Harbor High School has grown from a few students to more than 30. The Glee Club focuses mostly on music, but there's an anti-bullying message, too.

Joanne Heaslip is the leader of Sackets Harbor's Parent Teacher Organization and manager of the Glee Club. She's hoping the arts and music will build self-confidence in students. The TV show Glee has made the club popular and even students from other districts have joined.

Heaslip told Todd Moe that Thursday night rehearsals are fun, but she wants the experience to help students who sometimes feel bullied in school to build self-respect and confidence. For more information about Sackets Harbor's Glee Club: slips824@yahoo.com  Go to full article

Theater students respond to deployments

There are support groups for service members and spouses, but what about the children of 10th Mountain Division soldiers sent overseas? Last spring, a theater class at Indian River High School teamed up with a local playwright to produce a very personal look at how teens respond to their parents' deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan. In response to positive reaction, the play, In My Shoes, will be performed again tonight in Sackets Harbor and Saturday night in Clayton. Todd Moe met the students and creative team last June.  Go to full article
<i>There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom</i> this Thursday, Friday and Saturday night at Canton's Middle School.
There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom this Thursday, Friday and Saturday night at Canton's Middle School.

Preview: "There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom"

The Grasse River Players fall production opens Thursday night (7:30) in Canton and includes a cast of more than a dozen youngsters from three area school districts. There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom is based on Louis Sachar's book that's found on many middle school reading lists. The plot involves Bradley, a troubled fifth grader; his school counselor, Carla and classmate Jeff, and how they tackle some of the mysteries of growing up: friendship, self-esteem and respect for others.

Todd Moe spoke with three young actors and their director, Karen Wells, who says that although the cast is mostly tweens, the play has a message for adults, too.  Go to full article
It's a great forum for other young people to come together and express... what they're concerned about...

Young Thousand Islanders gather to create vision of region's future

The Thousand Islands Young Leaders Organization held a summit last Friday to gather ideas from young people about their vision for the future of the Thousand Islands Region. The group was founded in April 2008 to help improve quality of life for young Northern New Yorkers, and to get them more involved in their communities. Joanna Richards was at the summit and has this report.  Go to full article

"The Bus" moves to off-Broadway

In 2006, Burlington writer James Lantz's first play, The Bus, was a surprise hit. The play, about two boys who pursue a forbidden relationship late at night in a church bus, drew crowds and glowing reviews. It's set in a small town and deals with gay teens, sexuality, religion and homophobia. An off-Broadway theater is giving Lantz an opportunity to present his play to big city audiences this fall.

James Lantz has written three other plays, including American Machine, which was a co-commissioned project of The Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. As an award-winning filmmaker, he has produced, written and directed over 200 commercial films, videos and live events. Todd Moe spoke with him about The Bus and its off-Broadway debut in October.  Go to full article

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