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News stories tagged with "temperature"

Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/nikrowell/3202293273/">nikrowell</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: nikrowell, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Cold closes, delays schools across upstate NY

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) Schools from the Finger Lakes region to the Canadian border in northern New York are closed or delaying the start of classes because of temperatures that have plunged to as low as minus-32 in some upstate areas.  Go to full article
Mountain Mart in Canton, NY. According to EPA data, the agency found violations at seven gas stations in Malone, Massena, Moira, Plattsburgh, and Canton. Photo: David Sommerstein
Mountain Mart in Canton, NY. According to EPA data, the agency found violations at seven gas stations in Malone, Massena, Moira, Plattsburgh, and Canton. Photo: David Sommerstein

Cold snap draining fuel supplies, prices spiking

NEW YORK (AP) A second fierce blast of winter weather is sapping fuel supplies in many regions and sending prices for propane and natural gas to record highs.  Go to full article
Ice is thinner and less common on Lake Champlain since the 1970s.  (Photo: Brian Mann)
Ice is thinner and less common on Lake Champlain since the 1970s. (Photo: Brian Mann)

Climate study: Champlain Valley temperature has risen by 2 degrees F; more warming to come

This morning in Lake Placid, the Adirondack Research Consortium begins its annual conference. The group gathers to share the latest research and thinking about the North Country.

One of the papers being delivered this week focuses on the impact of climate change in the Champlain Valley. The research was funded by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy in an effort to find out how global warming might affect one relatively small region. The study shows that temperatures have already risen in the Champlain Valley by roughly two degrees Fahrenheit since the 1970s. Increased precipitation has also raised the lake level by an average of a foot. Warming is expected to continue over the next century.

Dr. Curt Stager, a researcher at Paul Smiths College, co-authored the study with Adirondack-based journalist Mary Thill. Stager told Brian Mann that scientists are struggling to understand the local impacts of climate change.  Go to full article

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