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News stories tagged with "terrorism"

Jack Burke won't be traveling to Sochi to watch Olympic competitions. Instead, he spent time in Europe watching his son Tim compete on the World Cup circuit. Photo: Brian Mann
Jack Burke won't be traveling to Sochi to watch Olympic competitions. Instead, he spent time in Europe watching his son Tim compete on the World Cup circuit. Photo: Brian Mann

For Olympic families, anxiety about Sochi

In these final weeks before the Winter Olympics in Sochi, there's growing of anxiety about safety and the threat of terrorism in Russia. The state department has issued a travel advisory for Americans traveling to the games. Some athletes in the US have been urging family members to say home.

Safety fears are only the latest complication for North Country families debating whether to make the trip to Sochi.  Go to full article
The Via Rail/Amtrak train "Maple Leaf" (shown here near Niagara Falls) makes the Toronto to New York City run. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/3336/5313641895/">Diego Torres Silvestre</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
The Via Rail/Amtrak train "Maple Leaf" (shown here near Niagara Falls) makes the Toronto to New York City run. Photo: Diego Torres Silvestre, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Canada disrupts Al Qaeda-supported "major terror plot"

Canadian officials say they have disrupted a "major" terror plot involving two men in Montreal and Toronto who were planning to derail a VIA passenger train.

According to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the pair were working with support from Al Qaeda elements based in Iran. Sources in the US say the men were planning to attack a train traveling from Toronto to New York City.

This news comes at a time when concerns are rising about terrorism activity based in Canada.  Go to full article
Sue Stebbins  (Photo: SUNY Potsdam)
Sue Stebbins (Photo: SUNY Potsdam)

Diversity expert among critics of NYPD surveillance of Muslim students

New York civil rights advocates want a meeting with Gov. Andrew Cuomo following a decision by the attorney general's office not to investigate the New York Police Department over its monitoring of Muslim students following the Sept. 11 attack.

The Associated Press reports that in a letter yesterday, the New York Civil Rights Coalition refuses to accept the decision by Attorney General Eric Schneiderman.

Schneiderman's office said there were legal obstacles that prevented the probe.
The coalition writes that the governor must direct state authorities to investigate the surveillance.

The Associated Press reported last week that the New York Police Department kept close watch on websites and blogs maintained by Muslim student associations across the northeast U.S., including at SUNY Potsdam and Clarkson University.

The surveillance reportedly took place in 2006 and 2007. Mayor Michael Bloomberg has faced a firestorm of criticism. But he continues to defend the police department, saying the city needs to be vigilant against terrorism.

Susan Stebbins is an anthropology professor at SUNY Potsdam. She's also special assistant to the president for diversity. The surveillance reportedly took place in 2006 and 2007. But Stebbins tells Julie Grant the college is just finding out about it now. (NCPR did request an interview with the New York Police Department, but didn't hear back for this story.)  Go to full article
For all those who lived through the nightmare of 9/11, horrific images are refreshed.

Cuomo steps up security precautions in wake of Bin Laden's death

Governor Andrew Cuomo says there is heightened security at "critical infrastructure" in New York City and New York State, following the capture and death of Osama bin Laden. In Albany, Karen DeWitt has the details:  Go to full article
Photo of Guantanamo Bay prison facility (Source:  According to Wikipedia, this is a public domain photo taken by a government official at Guantanamo Bay)
Photo of Guantanamo Bay prison facility (Source: According to Wikipedia, this is a public domain photo taken by a government official at Guantanamo Bay)

Civil liberties advocate tells Adirondack audience about fight over Guantanamo

Last month, the Bush administration lost a major Supreme Court fight over the treatment of prisoners held at the detention center in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The Court ruled that inmates held at the facility must be allowed to challenge their detentions in civilian court, and they must be presented with the evidence against them. The rules are known broadly as "habeas corpus" rights. Civil liberties advocates praised the decision. Critics say prisoners labeled as "enemy combatants" by President Bush shouldn't enjoy legal protections. Over the weekend, one of the attorneys who challenged the Bush Administration's terror policy spoke at a church in Keene Valley. Occasionally, North Country Public Radio broadcasts an excerpt of a speech given on an important topic in the North Country. This morning, we'll hear from Emi MacClean, who works for an organization called the Center for Constitutional Rights.  Go to full article
Sheriff David Favro and NY Homeland Security chief Michael Balboni in Plattsburgh
Sheriff David Favro and NY Homeland Security chief Michael Balboni in Plattsburgh

Region plans tighter border security

Just days after a scathing Federal report found big gaps in security along the US-Canada border, a coalition of New York state, Quebec Provincial, and local officials from the North Country say they plan to step up their efforts to stop illegal traffic. New York State Homeland Security Secretary Michael Balboni held a meeting yesterday in Plattsburg. As Brian Mann reports, they say better communication is the first step.  Go to full article
Politicians have spent hundreds of millions of dollars improving border crossings like this one north of Plattsburgh (Source: USGSA)
Politicians have spent hundreds of millions of dollars improving border crossings like this one north of Plattsburgh (Source: USGSA)

Report: US-Canada border "dangerously vulnerable"

Investigators for the Government Accountability Office say they were able to smuggle fake contraband designed to look like a dirty atomic bomb into the United States. The GAO is the investigative arm of Congress. In a report released yesterday, GAO officials say they crossed easily at seven different remote rural sites, including four unidentified spots on the US-Canada border. As Brian Mann reports, there's a growing bipartisan consensus that the Bush Administration's strategy for security on the northern border isn't working.  Go to full article

Border guard in TB scandal steps down

Federal officials say a border officer who waved a man with a dangerous strain of tuberculosis through the Champlain crossing north of Plattsburgh has "retired." As Brian Mann reports, the officer had been widely criticized by the media and by officials within the Department of Homeland Security.  Go to full article

Fireworks Craftsman May Have Trouble Continuing Explosive Hobby

Tonight's fireworks show in St Regis Falls was designed and handmade by Peter Henry, a pharmacist at Adirondack Medical Center. He makes fireworks out of his home workshop in Brighton. But new federal regulations on sales of explosive chemicals are making it harder and harder for him to continue his hobby. Gregory Warner paid Pete a visit last Friday.  Go to full article

Cheney Brings War Message to Drum

Vice President Dick Cheney is heading for Watertown today for a meet-and-greet with troops just back from Iraq. It's part of a concerted effort to shore up public support for the Iraq war. Martha Foley reports.  Go to full article

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