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News stories tagged with "theater"

Deborah Dunleavy as Bea Tompkins in <i>At the Canoe Club Dance</i>. The show opens Friday night (8 pm) at the Ourtown Theatre in Gananoque, Ontario.  Photo: Deborah Dunleavy
Deborah Dunleavy as Bea Tompkins in At the Canoe Club Dance. The show opens Friday night (8 pm) at the Ourtown Theatre in Gananoque, Ontario. Photo: Deborah Dunleavy

Preview: "At the Canoe Club Dance" in Gananoque

Brockville storyteller Deborah Dunleavy tells us about creating and performing her one-woman show, "At the Canoe Club Dance". She collected stories from seniors about life along the St. Lawrence in the 1940's, and her show includes stories, songs and music from the Swing Era. It opens in Gananoque on Friday night.  Go to full article

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Image: Funding campaign logo for the State's digital conversion
Image: Funding campaign logo for the State's digital conversion

Fund goal met, Tupper Lake theater will go digital rather than dark

The owner of Tupper Lake's cinema, Sally Strasser says community donations have raised enough money for the State Theater to pay for the costly conversion to new digital equipment. That's according to a report in the Adirondack Daily Enterprise.

Movie theaters across the Adirondacks have been struggling to raise money to pay for digital projectors that will be required as Hollywood phases out the use of traditional film.  Go to full article
Peter Shelburne (center) and the cast/crew of <i>Stealing the Packard</i>.  It'll be performed Friday, August 2nd and Saturday, August 3rd at 7:30pm at the Russell Opera House. Photo:  Grasse River Players
Peter Shelburne (center) and the cast/crew of Stealing the Packard. It'll be performed Friday, August 2nd and Saturday, August 3rd at 7:30pm at the Russell Opera House. Photo: Grasse River Players

Preview: "Stealing the Packard"

It's in the title, but the 1952 Packard -- a classic, luxury car -- is no where to be found in the play. That's the premise of Peter Shelburne's newest comedic drama. The show gets its world premiere by the Grasse River Players at the historic Russell Opera House this weekend. The entire show is set in a family's garage and includes a multi-generational cast. Todd Moe talks with playwright Peter Shelburne, actor Libby Brandt and director Dorothy Mallam.  Go to full article
Pendragon's new executive/artistic director Karen Lordi-Kirkham and managing director David Zwierankin. Photo: Mark Kurtz
Pendragon's new executive/artistic director Karen Lordi-Kirkham and managing director David Zwierankin. Photo: Mark Kurtz

Pendragon's new leadership team

Last week, Pendragon Theatre co-founders Susan Neal and Bob Pettee shared thoughts about starting Saranac Lake's professional theater group more than 30 years ago. Earlier this year, they moved to Maine and handed over management of the theatre to a new leadership team. Todd Moe talks with Pendragon's new Artistic Director Karen Lordi-Kirkham and Managing Director David Zwierankin.  Go to full article
Eric Craig as Hamlet, Paul Rainville as the Gravedigger in <i>Hamlet</i>. Photo: St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival
Eric Craig as Hamlet, Paul Rainville as the Gravedigger in Hamlet. Photo: St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival

Another summer of Shakespeare on the St. Lawrence

Comedy, tragedy and history are all part of this summer's lineup at the St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival in Prescott, Ontario. Todd Moe crossed the border to talk with artistic director Ian Farthing and some of the Canadian actors in this season's productions of Hamlet and Maid for a Musket.  Go to full article
Bob Pettee and Susan Neal, co-founders of Pendragon Theatre in Saranac Lake.  Photo: Mark Kurtz
Bob Pettee and Susan Neal, co-founders of Pendragon Theatre in Saranac Lake. Photo: Mark Kurtz

How Pendragon carved its niche in the world of regional theatres

Even though the co-founders of Pendragon Theatre in Saranac Lake, Susan Neal and Bob Pettee, have moved to Maine, the show goes on with new leadership and a full calendar of productions this summer. Pettee took his final bow on the Pendragon stage last December in a production of A Christmas Carol. Pettee and Neal founded Pendragon Theatre in 1981 and have handed it off to a new management team. We'll hear from executive/artistic director Karen Lordi-Kirkham and managing director David Zwierankin next week.

Earlier this year, Todd Moe sat down with Susan Neal and Bob Pettee at SUNY-Potsdam, as Susan was finishing her final semester of teaching drama. They talked about favorite memories at Pendragon and their plans for the future.  Go to full article
Kristina Diseth lives in Oslo, Norway, and has been a summer volunteer at Pendragon Theatre in Saranac for the last two seasons.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Kristina Diseth lives in Oslo, Norway, and has been a summer volunteer at Pendragon Theatre in Saranac for the last two seasons. Photo: Todd Moe

A Nordic connection at Pendragon Theatre

The 1980 Winter Olympics brought a lot of international visitors to the Adirondacks. Kristina Diseth, of Norway, worked as an office clerk at the Lake Placid Resort Hotel during the games.

Diseth made friends that year, and for the last couple of summers, she's been back in the Adirondacks as a volunteer at Pendragon Theatre in Saranac Lake. She's helped out with summer productions -- working with directors, in the costume shop and even sweeping the stage after performances. Diseth retired recently from a college theater career in Norway, and a chance to re-connect with old friends lured her back to the North Country.

Todd Moe caught up with her during a break in her duties to talk about a love of theater and leaving one mountainous region to visit another. That's today's "Heard Up North."  Go to full article
Bill Bowers.  Photos: <a href="http://bill-bowers.com">bill-bowers.com</a>
Bill Bowers. Photos: bill-bowers.com

Bill Bowers: mime and monologue in Lake Placid

Actor/mime Bill Bowers brings his one-man show, It Goes Without Saying, back to the Adirondacks next Monday night. The show, which began ten years ago at the Adirondack Theater Festival in Glens Falls, has traveled around the country from Manhattan to Alaska. When it premiered Off-Broadway, the New York Times called it "zestful and endearing."

He'll perform it Monday at 5:30 pm at the "A Taste of the Arts" dinner at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts.

Todd Moe talks with Bowers about the success of his quirky, autobiographical production based on his life and theatrical career. From a childhood in rural Montana, to Broadway, to training with Marcel Marceau, Bowers says, It Goes Without Saying, tells a funny and touching story of the important role that silence plays both on stage and in life.  Go to full article
The St. Lawrence University cast of "Have You Filled Your Bucket Today?" at a performance in Canton in 2011. Photo: Ann Marie Gardinier Halstead
The St. Lawrence University cast of "Have You Filled Your Bucket Today?" at a performance in Canton in 2011. Photo: Ann Marie Gardinier Halstead

Fighting bullying with theatre and creativity

An anti-bullying organization will use a play written by a St. Lawrence University theater professor as part of its "peaceful schools" tour this spring.

SLU Associate Professor of Performance and Communication Arts Ann Marie Gardinier Halstead, is the author of the one-act play, Have you Filled a Bucket Today?. She says schools and parents seem eager to use the arts and creative ways to address bullying in schools.

Based on Carol McCloud's popular children's book of the same name, the play also emphasizes that bullying is wrong. The organization, Peaceful Schools, will perform the play at schools in northern and central New York throughout the 2013-2014 school year.

Halstead told Todd Moe that she first heard about McCloud's book at a meeting at her son's school, and was thrilled when McCloud gave her permission to adapt it as a play.  Go to full article

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