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News stories tagged with "timber"

Eileen Simollardes (at right) from Vermont Gas outlines the pipeline project.  Cornwall select board chairman Bruce Hiland (in blue) looks on at left.  (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Eileen Simollardes (at right) from Vermont Gas outlines the pipeline project. Cornwall select board chairman Bruce Hiland (in blue) looks on at left. (Photo: Brian Mann)

NY-VT tension shapes Ticonderoga gas pipeline project

The US and Canada are carrying more and more energy produced in North America on rail tank cars. That's controversial, especially after this summer's disaster in Lac-Megantic.

But there's also a fierce debate underway over construction of new pipelines to carry the surge of domestic natural gas and oil. Much of the controversy has focused on the Keystone XL project in the Midwest. But we have our own pipeline battle shaping up here in the North Country.

A company in Vermont hopes to build a new line that would feed natural gas from Vermont underneath Lake Champlain to the International Paper mill in Ticonderoga. Some environmental activists and local government leaders in Vermont are promising to block the project unless major changes are made.  Go to full article
You'll find horses, axes, logs and more on Saturday during the Adirondack Rural Skills and Homesteading Festival at the Paul Smiths VIC.  Photo: Brett McLeod
You'll find horses, axes, logs and more on Saturday during the Adirondack Rural Skills and Homesteading Festival at the Paul Smiths VIC. Photo: Brett McLeod

Learning rural "lost arts" at the Paul Smiths VIC

NCPR is media sponsor for the Adirondack Rural Skills and Homesteading Festival this Saturday (10-to-4) at the Paul Smiths VIC. Exhibitions will include logging and farming with horses, and competitive lumberjack sports with the Paul Smiths College Woodsmen's Team. Workshops range from canning and cider making to wood working and small-scale farming. Paul Smiths College professor Brett McLeod calls these "lost arts", and he told Todd Moe that the event is all about learning from past generations.  Go to full article
Log rolling at the annual Tupper Lake event.  Photo: Tupper Lake Woodsmen's Association
Log rolling at the annual Tupper Lake event. Photo: Tupper Lake Woodsmen's Association

Tupper Lake celebrates 30 years of "Woodsmen's Days"

This weekend marks the 30th anniversary of the Tupper Lake Woodsmen's Days. Todd Moe talks with co-organizer Shawn Augustus about Tupper Lake's celebration of logging and the timber industry.  Go to full article
An Adirondack clearcut in the 1920s. Clear-cutting remains controversial a century later. Photo: New York State Archives
An Adirondack clearcut in the 1920s. Clear-cutting remains controversial a century later. Photo: New York State Archives

Clearcut logging plan sparks blistering APA debate

A plan by the Adirondack Park Agency to streamline permit applications for large-scale clearcut logging sparked fierce debate yesterday.

Supporters of the plan say it will encourage loggers and landowners to adopt better harvesting practices. At the APA's monthly meeting in Ray Brook, some commissioners spoke passionately in favor of the change.

But others expressed deep skepticism about the plan.  Go to full article
A clear cut near Speculator managed by Lyme Timber.  Sometimes a woodlot that looks heavily logged is being managed well, while a parcel with lots of trees can be made of "junk" timber. Photo used by permission
A clear cut near Speculator managed by Lyme Timber. Sometimes a woodlot that looks heavily logged is being managed well, while a parcel with lots of trees can be made of "junk" timber. Photo used by permission

A million acres of Adk timberland becoming "junk"?

In recent weeks, the Adirondack Park has become embroiled in a new debate over clearcut logging.

But a growing coalition of environmentalists, industry leaders, government officials and academics agree on one thing.

More than a million acres of the Park's privately-owned timber land is deteriorating -- turning into what some critics describe as "junk" forest.

That trend threatens the long-term environmental health of the Adirondacks, as well as the health of the North Country's logging industry.  Go to full article
Protect the Adirondacks argues that too much clearcutting is already going on without enough monitoring by state officials. This image, posted by Protect on the group's website, was taken from the Bing mapping system.
Protect the Adirondacks argues that too much clearcutting is already going on without enough monitoring by state officials. This image, posted by Protect on the group's website, was taken from the Bing mapping system.

APA backs off controversial clear-cut logging rule

The Adirondack Park Agency is delaying action on a controversial plan to revise clearcut logging rules in the park.

The change would have affected about 700,000 acres of private timberland owned by large companies and property owners.

The logging industry strongly supported the measure, as did many academic foresters, but a coalition of green groups rallied to oppose it.  Go to full article
Logging truck in the Adirondacks. Photo: <a href"http://www.flickr.com/photos/ellenm1/">ellenm1</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">some rights reserved</a>
Logging truck in the Adirondacks. Photo: ellenm1, CC some rights reserved

APA delays new clear-cutting rule for Adk loggers

State officials are delaying consideration of a new plan that would ease clear-cutting rules for loggers working in the Adirondack Park.

The measure was expected to be taken up at the Adirondack Park Agency meeting next week in Ray Brook.

If approved, it will allow some timber operators to clear-cut stands of trees larger than 25 acres without a full review by the Adirondack Park Agency.  Go to full article
The Essex Chain of Lakes will be purchased by New York State this year. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy)
The Essex Chain of Lakes will be purchased by New York State this year. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy)

NY to shape public use of new Adirondack park land

State officials say they plan to buy the first big chunk of the former Finch timberlands by the end of the year.

Roughly 19,000 acres will be added to the "forever wild" forest preserve in the first phase of the project. State officials say they plan to buy the first big chunk of the former Finch timberlands by the end of the year. Roughly 19,000 acres will be added to the "forever wild" forest preserve in the first phase of the project. Supporters say these lands will open popular new areas for hiking, paddling, hunting and fishing.

The process is now underway to determine the kind of rules and guidelines that will shape public access, and state officials say they hope to avoid the kind of clashes that have marked past land classification efforts.  Go to full article
North Country has plenty of wood pellet energy, not enough consumers. Photo: Jasmine Wallace
North Country has plenty of wood pellet energy, not enough consumers. Photo: Jasmine Wallace

North Country's wood pellet heat industry struggles, despite abundance

This week, we're taking a fresh look at the idea of renewable and locally produced energy in the North Country. For many homeowners, one of the most accessible and affordable ways to shift away from fossil fuels is to buy a pellet stove. Those are wood stoves or furnaces that burn those little rabbit-pellet sized chunks of wood or grass.

A few years ago, there was sort of a boom in the pellet stove industry. But now the market has sagged. As Brian Mann reports, local companies say the technology needs to get even easier and more user-friendly for more consumers to give it a try.  Go to full article
The Nature Conservancy acknowledges that silt from this site reached a trout stream (Photo:  Dan Snyder)
The Nature Conservancy acknowledges that silt from this site reached a trout stream (Photo: Dan Snyder)

Nature Conservancy loggers accused of damaging Adirondack trout stream

The Adirondack Nature Conservancy has emerged in recent years as one of the largest owners of timberland in the North Country.

The green group uses certified logging methods designed to protect rivers and other sensitive ecosystems.

But a landowner in Essex County is accusing the Conservancy's tree-cutters of damaging a certified trout stream.

As Brian Mann reports, state officials have opened an investigation.  Go to full article

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