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News stories tagged with "time"

Christopher Buerkett will sign copies of "69 Seconds: Poetry in Time's Need" at The Bookstore Plus in Lake Placid from 3-5 pm on Saturday. Photo: Christopher Buerkett
Christopher Buerkett will sign copies of "69 Seconds: Poetry in Time's Need" at The Bookstore Plus in Lake Placid from 3-5 pm on Saturday. Photo: Christopher Buerkett

Saranac Lake poet and clock repairer publishes first book

Christopher Buerkett composes poems while focusing on the inner workings of clocks.

Buerkett owns a clock repair shop in Saranac Lake and has just published his first book of poetry: "69 Seconds: Poetry in Time's Need." In the book, his poems are adorned with photos of old timepieces and clock parts. He told Todd Moe that, for him, poetry feels like painting with words.  Go to full article
Grytviken, South Georgia Island. Photo: <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Grytviken_Harbour,_Island_of_South_Georgia,_United_Kingdom.jpg">Lexaxis7</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Grytviken, South Georgia Island. Photo: Lexaxis7, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

New Year's Eve in the loneliest time zone

2014 begins at 00:00 AM January first local time. Here in Canton, NY that will occur 5 hours after it does in Great Britain, home of Greenwich Mean Time (which is now called UTC, Universal Coordinated Time).

Other places have different UTC offsets, Chicago is UTC-6, Japan UTC+9 etc. But what about UTC-2?

UTC-2 is in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, and at its very southern end lies South Georgia Island, the only inhabited place in the zone! It's located just 1,400 miles from Argentina (which claims the Island as well as Great Britain) and 1,000 from Antarctica.

Confirming this wasn't easy. I found only three phone numbers listed for the Island (it has a population of 28). One for the whaling museum in Grytkiven and two for the Government offices on nearby King Edward Point.

I spoke with Tom Brannon via Skype to see what life is like on New Year's Eve in UTC-2.  Go to full article
Christopher Buerkett working in his shop in Rainbow Lake (Photos:  Mark Kurtz, on assignment for NCPR)
Christopher Buerkett working in his shop in Rainbow Lake (Photos: Mark Kurtz, on assignment for NCPR)

Traditional Work, Part 2: A master at fixing antique timepieces

This week we've begun a series looking at artisans in the North Country who still do traditional work, everything from taxidermy to calligraphy. Often that kind of work is passed from hand to hand, with one craftsman teaching and shaping the technique of the next over hundreds of years.

This morning, Brian Mann profiles Christopher Buerkett, a master clock repairer who lives in Rainbow Lake in the northern Adirondacks.

He learned his trade from another master clock repairer who worked in Saranac Lake. Now he's keeping alive a tradition of time-keeping that dates back to the 13th century. It's a mysterious art of intricate cogs and engineering that reshaped the way we think about the world.  Go to full article

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