Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "tomatoes"

Late blight on a tomato. Photo: Kirsten Jennings via flickr, some rights reserved.
Late blight on a tomato. Photo: Kirsten Jennings via flickr, some rights reserved.

Late blight confirmed in St. Lawrence County

Tomato and potato growers beware. Cornell Cooperative Extension has confirmed the first case of late blight in St. Lawrence County.  Go to full article
Late blight on a tomato. Photo: Kirsten Jennings via flickr, some rights reserved.
Late blight on a tomato. Photo: Kirsten Jennings via flickr, some rights reserved.

An update on late blight and keeping perennial beds neat

Late blight was recently confirmed in a few more upstate counties. Todd Moe talks with Amy Ivy, Executive Director/Horticulture Educator at cooperative extension in Clinton and Essex counties, about tips for dealing with the tomato disease. Amy also has some ideas for late-summer perennial garden maintenance.  Go to full article

Keeping tomato plants under control mid-summer

The tomato plants in the garden are growing like they're never going to stop - and if it weren't for frost, they probably wouldn't. Martha Foley talks with horticulturalist Amy Ivy of the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Clinton and Essex counties about caring for tomato plants mid-summer, including early blight, late blight and when to pinch off new blossoms and green growth.  Go to full article
Horticulturist Amy Ivy
Horticulturist Amy Ivy

Late blight vs. early blight, explained

Growers are nervous this summer as they hope late blight won't resurface in the North Country. The disease devastated tomato and potato crops across the Northeast last summer. David Sommerstein talks with Amy Ivy, horticulturalist for the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Clinton and Essex counties, for the latest on late blight. She says gardeners are confusing the disease with early blight and other, more common, diseases.  Go to full article
LaFargeville students fill buckets with soil and tomato seedlings for local food pantries.
LaFargeville students fill buckets with soil and tomato seedlings for local food pantries.

Fighting hunger by the bucket

Three hundred "bucket gardens" are being handed out to those in need at food pantries in Jefferson County this week. LaFargeville students, nutrition experts at Cornell Cooperative Extension and the Food Bank of Central New York have teamed up again this year to help increase food security and decrease hunger. Rosalind Cook, with Cornell Cooperation Extension, told Todd Moe that the "garden in a bucket" program began four years ago, and each year they get more ambitious.  Go to full article

Vegetable gardeners on the look-out for a return of late blight

It was in the 80s and 90s across the North Country this past weekend. Some eager gardeners were no doubt out in the vegetable patch, planting the earliest of early crops, like spinach and peas. It won't be long till the planting season is underway in earnest. And there's an important question lingering from last year: what about late blight?

Horticulturist Amy Ivy assures Martha Foley there are no worries about tomatoes carrying the disease over the winter, but potatoes are another story.  Go to full article

Still more late-blight news

Martha Foley and horticulturist Amy Ivy share more news on late-blight and tomatoes. Amy urges caution during the canning season.  Go to full article

Keeping the garden to a ?dull roar?

North Country gardens are thriving with the recent rain and hot weather. How can gardeners keep up? Horticulturist Amy Ivy shares advice with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

When the garden grows rampant

This is the time of year to keep a close eye on the garden. It seems to change daily, as the climbing flowers and vegetables begin to get out of control. Todd Moe talks with horticulturist Amy Ivy about tips for staking flowers and climbing plants. Amy says even she sometimes has trouble keeping the garden looking nice and healthy.  Go to full article

Tomato ban hits hard on the farm

The Food and Drug Administration continues to investigate the source of tainted tomatoes that sickened more than 160 people. It's narrowing down the source of the salmonella bacteria, and has lifted a ban on tomato sales in many states. Julie Grant reports on how the ban has affected tomato growers.  Go to full article

1-10 of 19  next 9 »  last »