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News stories tagged with "top-story"

Bakken crude oil train next to children's playground at Ezra Prentince Houses in Albany. Photo by Jenna Flanagan
Bakken crude oil train next to children's playground at Ezra Prentince Houses in Albany. Photo by Jenna Flanagan

Local Albany officials say they're not ready for crude oil accidents

Albany County officials are trying to reassure the public over concerns about the crude oil trains that travel through the city. The city's port has become a major hub for rail shipments of volatile crude from the Midwest. Many of those trains travel the length of Lake Champlain on their way south from Canada.

Officials have acknowledged that the trains pose a significant risk. At a recent Common Council, they admitted that depending on the nature of an accident, there's little local emergency services could do.  Go to full article
Ray Hill says the safety of raw milk depends on a farmer's integrity
Ray Hill says the safety of raw milk depends on a farmer's integrity

Raw milk debate, alive in the North Country

New restrictions on raw milk sales in Wisconsin and Massachusetts are returning one of America's fiercest food debates to the headlines. More people are seeking out unpasteurized milk. They cite a broad range of health benefits and support for local dairies. But health officials and many scientists insist drinking raw milk is too risky. Even Locavore-in-Chief Michael Pollan cautions raw milk drinkers "not to turn a blind eye to the food safety concerns." In New York, about 30 dairies are licensed to sell direct from the farm, including five in the North Country. The law requires consumers to bring their own containers and actually watch as the milk is poured from the bulk tank. David Sommerstein got an up-close look at the raw milk debate at a farm in St. Lawrence County and has our story.  Go to full article
Chris Rdzanek, manager of museum facilities at The Wild Center, shows off the new boiler (PHOTO:  Brian Mann)
Chris Rdzanek, manager of museum facilities at The Wild Center, shows off the new boiler (PHOTO: Brian Mann)

As outdoor wood boilers draw fire, a new generation of wood heat comes on line

While the debate rages over pollution of outdoor wood boilers, a new generation of wood heat systems is already being rolled out.

Scientists and manufacturers say so-called "wood gasification" boilers burn much more efficiently with far less smoke and ash. A new, state-of-the-art boiler is now on-line at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake, burning wood pellets produced in Massena.

As Brian Mann reports, the manufacturer hopes to sell similar systems to businesses and government offices across the North Country.  Go to full article

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