Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "tourism"

After A Summer Of Rain, Tourism Dips

It's been a soggy summer. Through July and August the National Weather service in Burlington recorded more than fifteen inches of rain. That's three times the amount that fell during the same period last year. The clouds had a dampening affect on farmers. But as Brian Mann reports, the weather also hurt hundreds of small businesses that rely on summer tourism.  Go to full article

Groups Say Bush Mercury Plan Could Hurt Tourism

Several environmental and sporting groups are criticizing the Bush administration's plan to reduce mercury from power plants. They say it protects utilities at the expense of public health and the tourism industry. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Stephanie Hemphill reports.  Go to full article

New NNY Tourism Data Online

Economic developers, entrepreneurs, and anyone who's just plain curious about the North Country now have a powerful new tool. The Northern New York Travel and Tourism Research Center, based at SUNY Potsdam, has compiled data profiles for the 10 counties of northern New York and published them online. The profiles have data on hotel rooms, traffic counts, employment, campgrounds, marinas, fishing and hunting licenses, and snowmobile trails. Laurie Marr is the center's director. She told David Sommerstein she saw a need for a central source for tourism-related statistics.  Go to full article
Sean Brabant, Clayton, riding the wave
Sean Brabant, Clayton, riding the wave

Watertown Debuts on Kayaking Circuit

You can find challenging whitewater rapids on rivers all over this country. But the U.S. Freestyle Kayaking Association chose one wave on the Black River in Watertown to test its best kayakers. The winners will compete at the freestyle kayaking world championships this winter in Australia. Organizers of last weekend's Blackwater Challenge hope the event will show Watertown is ready for global competition in the future. David Sommerstein visited the tournament and has our story.  Go to full article

Kayakers Compete in Watertown After Delay

Long-awaited sun and high waters have greeted competitors in a national freestyle kayaking competition on the Black River in Watertown. As David Sommerstein reports, the tournament was delayed due to the summer's heavy rainfall.  Go to full article

Rainfalls Spike Throughout Summer, But Relief Is In Sight

Farmers aren't the only ones who've struggled with this year's wet, chilly summer. Tourist businesses across the north country are suffering through a tough season. So are parents with kids who like to go swimming. Brian Mann spoke with Brooke Taber, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service In Burlington, who says we will get a last gasp of real summer.  Go to full article

APA Approves Controversial Jay Bridge

On Friday, the Adirondack Park Agency approved a controversial plan to build a new bridge across the east branch of the Ausable River. The structure - in the town of Jay -- will sit just downstream from the old covered bridge, which will now serve as a foot and bicycle crossing. As Brian Mann reports, the 7-million dollar project is still dividing locals after years of debate.  Go to full article
Whiteface Mountain
Whiteface Mountain

State Drops Ski Hut Plan for Whiteface

State officials have dropped a plan to build private ski huts on Whiteface Mountain. The proposal drew fire from pro-environment groups. As Brian Mann reports, the Olympic Regional Development Agency still hopes to move forward with a major expansion of the mountain.  Go to full article

Remembering Irish Sacrifice on the Rideau Canal

The 47 locks and 18 dams of the Rideau Canal are a giant draw for boaters and tourists in the summer months. The system connects Montreal with Kingston, Ontario via Ottawa. The British built the canal after the War of 1812 to allow boats to travel inland rather than risking a potentially dangerous transit along the border waters of the St. Lawrence River. The project was the largest of its kind in the British Empire at the time, and mostly Irish immigrants worked on it. Hundreds died. On Sunday in Ottawa, Canadian officials will unveil a Celtic Cross memorial in honor of the fallen canal workers. David Sommerstein spoke with Ken Clavette, a member of the Rideau Canal Celtic Cross Committee. He says it's hard to pin down how many people died building the canal system.  Go to full article
IP land around Loon Lake Mtn.
IP land around Loon Lake Mtn.

Looking At IP Land Deal, From On High

In April, International Paper announced that the corporation will sell development and recreation rights on a quarter-million acres in the Adirondack Mountains. Logging will continue on much of the land, but the easement with the state of New York is expected to open vast new areas to hikers and snowmobile riders. The purchase could cost taxpayers as much as twenty million dollars. Phil Brown is editor with the Adirondack Explorer, a magazine that covers recreation issues in the Park. He spoke with Brian Mann about the deal, while sitting on a peak that could be a popular new destination.  Go to full article

« first  « previous 10  400-808 of 503  next -305 »  last »