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News stories tagged with "toxic-chemicals"

Part of the 7.2 mile contaminated stretch of the Grasse. Photo: David Sommerstein
Part of the 7.2 mile contaminated stretch of the Grasse. Photo: David Sommerstein

Mohawks rip EPA's Grasse River cleanup plan

Update: The EPA released its final plan for the Alcoa Grasse River cleanup late this morning. More information is at The Inbox.

Just ahead of the release of a plan to clean up toxic chemicals from the Grasse River near Massena, the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe blasted federal officials for putting the economy ahead of the environment.  Go to full article
Part of the area to be cleaned up by Perras Environmental Control.  Photo: David Sommerstein.
Part of the area to be cleaned up by Perras Environmental Control. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Massena firm wins GM cleanup bid

A local environmental firm was selected for the next cleanup phase of General Motors' contaminated site in Massena.  Go to full article

EPA forces clean up at General Motors' Massena plant

The post-bailout arm of General Motors that's in charge of liquidating failed assets of the car-maker wants to tear down the Powertrain plant in Massena. The plant closed for good last year. But the buildings, the equipment, and the soil underneath is contaminated with toxic PCB oil. Federal environment officials now say Motors Liquidation Company has to clean it all up before demolition can begin. As David Sommerstein reports, the extent of the contamination has some former workers and the Massena community worried.  Go to full article
Responders load containment boom onto a boat...
Responders load containment boom onto a boat...

Seaway readies its spill response, too

As the effects of the Gulf oil spill continue to grow, all was calm and sunny on the St. Lawrence River Wednesday. That was the setting for the St. Lawrence Seaway to test its spill response plans. The exercise raised two questions. Should some of the containment boom and manpower positioned along the St. Lawrence be used to help in the Gulf? And if the River were to be the site of a spill today, could America fight oil spills on two fronts? David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Larry Lago (left) and friends burn a wood shed outside Copenhagen.
Larry Lago (left) and friends burn a wood shed outside Copenhagen.

Burn ban has fans and critics

A rural tradition is now a thing of the past, or at least, so says the law. Two weeks ago, New York outlawed burn barrels and many other types of open burning. You can still burn brush and small tree limbs and have small campfires. The question is will people obey the new burn ban? David Sommerstein surveyed some residents and has our story.  Go to full article

St. Lawrence tables J&L site decision

St. Lawrence County lawmakers want more time to decide whether to foreclose on the site of a polluted former iron mine in the southern part of the county. Residents of Clifton and Fine want the county to take control of the J&L mines site so a wood chip processor can open a plant there. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Toxic flame-fighter still in use

Two forms of a toxic flame retardant are being phased out by companies or banned by state laws. But, Lester Graham reports, a third form is still being used.  Go to full article

Ins and outs of proposed burn ban

Tomorrow night is the last public comment session in the North Country about the state's proposed ban on burn barrels and other forms of opening burning. It'll be held from 4 to 8 at SUNY Canton. There's widespread agreement that burning garbage outside is very bad for public health and the environment. But there are concerns about unintended economic consequences. As David Sommerstein reports, the devil's in the details.  Go to full article

River scientists convene in Cornwall

150 scientists from the U.S. and Canada meet in Cornwall, Ontario, today to assess the health of the St. Lawrence River. The St. Lawrence River Institute's annual conference comes on the eve of the 50th anniversary of the construction of the hydropower dam. The dam brought clean power and good jobs, but also pollution, Superfund sites, and environmental destruction. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Massena backs up to its riverfront.  Leaders hope a dam can spark a revival.
Massena backs up to its riverfront. Leaders hope a dam can spark a revival.

Massena's hydropower hopes fuel debate

In 1997, Massena's 200-year old dam breached, sending miles of slow, flat water downstream. Environmentalists saw the change as a victory for free-flowing rivers and the endangered fish that thrive in them. But many Massena residents miss the high, placid waters of the old Grasse River. People used to fish and boat there. Local leaders have started a movement to return the pond, by building a hydropower dam half-a-mile downriver from where the old dam used to be. The dam's fueled a classic debate of the economy versus the environment, but with a twist. A Superfund site of toxic chemicals is also in the mix. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

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