Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "trade"

Sen. Schumer (L) and Assemblyman Darrel Aubertine, with a poster of the 1000 Islands Int'l Bridge in background.
Sen. Schumer (L) and Assemblyman Darrel Aubertine, with a poster of the 1000 Islands Int'l Bridge in background.

Schumer Pushes Passport Alternatives

Senator Chuck Schumer met with North Country leaders yesterday in Watertown. The New York Democrat discussed the impact of proposed requirements for crossing the border with Canada. Last month, the Department of Homeland Security said everyone would need a passport to cross the border by 2008. The announcement caught most people by surprise, even President Bush, who said he read about it in the newspaper. The President has urged the government to look for other options. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Mohawk-Canada Trade Dispute Revived

An international human rights commission is reviving a 15 year-old Mohawk trade dispute with Canada. The case centers on whether Akwesasne Mohawks in the U.S. can carry goods duty-free across the border to trade with other native tribes. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

US-Canada Summit "Postponed"

Concerns over US-Canada relations are likely to intensify, following an announcement on Sunday that President Bush has postponed a trip to Ottawa. The move comes as the two countries disagree over the war in Iraq and over major trade disputes. As Brian Mann reports, Prime Minister Jean Chretien will instead be meeting with former President Bill Clinton.  Go to full article

Canada?s Ambassador: A ?Squall? Hits US-Canada Relations

Canada's ambassador to the U-S says "emotional" times have strained relations between the two countries. Speaking Monday at Plattsburgh State University, Ambassador Michael Kergin defended Canada's decision not to support the Invasion of Iraq. But that stance angered the Bush Administration and may complicate trade talks. As Brian Mann reports, the international tension is being felt most sharply in towns along the border.

Tomorrow, Ottawa correspondent Karen Kelly talks with Canadians about their views of relations between the two countries.  Go to full article

U-S Canada Border: Once A Line On A Map, Now A Defended Frontier

Just a few years ago, New York's border with Canada was little more than a line on a map. Since September 11th, state and federal officials have spent moved aggressively to tighten security. Governor George Pataki is now sending 120 new state troopers to help patrol the 400-mile frontier. New technology is being installed at major crossings - including massive x-ray machines and radiation detectors. As Brian Mann reports, the policy marks a major shift, at a time when relations between the two countries are already strained.  Go to full article

Border Security Could Mean Travel Delays

With the war against Iraq now underway, officials in the U-S and Canada have tightened border security. Some truckers and travelers have reported travel delays, but as Brian Mann reports, customs officials north of Plattsburgh say they're adding staff to help keep traffic moving.  Go to full article

Greens Decry Canadian Oil Exports

Canadian environmental groups say the American demand for fossil fuels is harming Canada's environment. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Karen Kelly reports  Go to full article

New York Leaders Oppose Seaway Expansion

This week two of New York's political leaders came out against expansion of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway system to accomodate bigger ships. They say it would be an environmental disaster for the St. Lawrence River and doesn't consider all the river's users. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Cross-border Trade and Tighter Security

Business groups in New York are lobbying in Washington to curb delays at the U.S.-Canadian border, in northern and western parts of the state. The business leaders say the new security precautions since September 11th are hurting trade. Karen Dewitt reports.  Go to full article

Cross Border Commerce Since 9/11

A year after last September's terror attacks, the world's longest undefended border has become a much tighter frontier. Bob Keyes of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Ottawa says ever since terrorists took down the World Trade Center, the 49th parallel has become more difficult to cross, especially for Canadian businesses trying to peddle goods in the U-S. Jody Tosti reports.  Go to full article

« first  « previous 10  24-56 of 36  next -20 »  last »