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News stories tagged with "traditional-work"

The headstock of the guitar Tracy inlayed for the FarmAid 25th Anniversary concert.  John Mellencamp, Willie Nelson, Dave Matthews and Neil Young all played this guitar in the concert.
The headstock of the guitar Tracy inlayed for the FarmAid 25th Anniversary concert. John Mellencamp, Willie Nelson, Dave Matthews and Neil Young all played this guitar in the concert.

Guitar maker Tracy Cox embraces traditional techniques to make modern instruments

While reporting on traditional work the last couple of weeks, we learned about a North Country craftsman who builds stringed instruments and applies inlay to them in a way that is the same as it has been done for generations. It wasn't long before Joel Hurd, a guitar enthusiast himself, was on his way to Parishville to meet Tracy Cox.  Go to full article
Matt Foley in his hydro dam in Wadhams. Photo: Brian Mann
Matt Foley in his hydro dam in Wadhams. Photo: Brian Mann

Traditional Work, Pt. 7: Powering a modern economy with a vintage hydro dam

This week, North Country Public Radio is continuing our look at people in the North Country who do traditional work, reviving industries that have been part of this region's economy for a century or more.

Today, we revisit Brian Mann's conversation with Matt Foley. He began his career as a glass blower, but he wound up refurbishing old hydro dams in the Adirondacks.

Using antique equipment, Foley is generating power that lights homes and businesses from St. Regis Falls to Westport.  Go to full article
John Scarlett in his shop in Rossie (Photo provided)
John Scarlett in his shop in Rossie (Photo provided)

Traditional Work, Pt. 6: Shaping flowers from steel at a forge in Rossie

This week, we're continuing our conversations with artisans in the North Country who do traditional work. These are industries, and skills, that have been a way of life in our region for a century and more. This morning, we visit a forge operated by blacksmith John Scarlett in Rossie for thirty years.

Scarlett uses fire and metal to create everything from tools to works of art. On the day we visited, he was working on a sculpture of Asian poppies, forged out of steel and copper.  Go to full article
Ted Elk scrapes honey off the comb.  (Photo: Julie Grant)
Ted Elk scrapes honey off the comb. (Photo: Julie Grant)

Traditional Work, Pt. 5: Master beekeeper says the job has gotten more challenging

This week and next, North Country Public Radio is exploring the lives of people who do traditional work. These are arts and types of industry that people would have been using to make a living in our region a century ago, or even longer. Ted Elk has been a beekeeper for nearly 20 years - with hives from Clayton, to Evans Mills, to Fort Drum. He says it's become much more labor intensive in that time. Julie Grant visited him Hammond.  Go to full article
Bud Piserchia painting the nose on one of his mounts. (PHOTO:  Mark Kurtz)
Bud Piserchia painting the nose on one of his mounts. (PHOTO: Mark Kurtz)

Traditional Work, Pt. 4: A taxidermist in Keene masters paint, sculpture and stitchery

This week and next, North Country Public Radio is exploring the lives of people who do traditional work. These are arts and types of industry that people would have been using to make a living in our region a century ago, or even longer. Bud Piserchia is a master taxidermist working in Keene. Over the last four decades, his North Country Taxidermy shop has also emerged one of the most important marketplaces in the Northeast for animal skins and antlers. Bud spoke about his work recently with Brian Mann.  Go to full article
Gail Brill at work in Saranac Lake
Gail Brill at work in Saranac Lake

Traditional Work, Part 3: An art and a career, one letter at a time

This week, North Country Public Radio has begun a look at artisans who still make part of their livelihood from traditional work. These are professions that might have been found in North Country villages a century ago. This morning, we revisit Brian Mann's conversation with calligrapher Gail Brill. From her studio in Saranac Lake, Brill's distinctive work goes all over the country. Here's Brian's story which first aired in 2007.  Go to full article
Christopher Buerkett working in his shop in Rainbow Lake (Photos:  Mark Kurtz, on assignment for NCPR)
Christopher Buerkett working in his shop in Rainbow Lake (Photos: Mark Kurtz, on assignment for NCPR)

Traditional Work, Part 2: A master at fixing antique timepieces

This week we've begun a series looking at artisans in the North Country who still do traditional work, everything from taxidermy to calligraphy. Often that kind of work is passed from hand to hand, with one craftsman teaching and shaping the technique of the next over hundreds of years.

This morning, Brian Mann profiles Christopher Buerkett, a master clock repairer who lives in Rainbow Lake in the northern Adirondacks.

He learned his trade from another master clock repairer who worked in Saranac Lake. Now he's keeping alive a tradition of time-keeping that dates back to the 13th century. It's a mysterious art of intricate cogs and engineering that reshaped the way we think about the world.  Go to full article
Blacksmithing. Photo: Wasapl via wikipedia
Blacksmithing. Photo: Wasapl via wikipedia

Traditional work in the North Country, part 1

This week, North Country Public Radio spends time exploring traditional work in the contemporary culture and economy. Things like blacksmithing, lumbering, taxidermy, and clock repair. This is work that may date back centuries, but which persists in niches of our region's communities.

Jill Breit is executive director of Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, also known as TAUNY. She sets the stage this morning. She told Martha Foley when she thinks of traditional occupations in the region, she's thinking in two ways.

Tomorrow we continue our series with Brian Mann's profile of a traditional clock repairer in the Adirondacks.  Go to full article

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