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News stories tagged with "travel"

Karoly Sziladi, Judith Ginsburg and Kit Barham conduct, accompany and coach young musicians in Stellae Boreales. Photo: Lucy Martin
Karoly Sziladi, Judith Ginsburg and Kit Barham conduct, accompany and coach young musicians in Stellae Boreales. Photo: Lucy Martin

Ottawa's Stellae Boreales helps young musicians shine

Music lessons are a part of life for many families. There are different methods of instruction, including something called the Suzuki method. It was developed in Japan by violinist Shinichi Suzuki and eventually became a successful style of learning around the world.

The Ottawa Suzuki Strings is an umbrella organization that organizes lessons for students of all ages. The most advanced young players can experience tours and public performance with the violin ensemble Stellae Boreales.

Lucy Martin took in a recent rehearsal to learn more about both programs.  Go to full article
Celia Evans, lower right, teaches Russian students some of her favorite songs. Photo: Celia Evans
Celia Evans, lower right, teaches Russian students some of her favorite songs. Photo: Celia Evans

Teaching and learning in Siberia

This fall, an ecology professor at Paul Smiths College traveled thousands of miles to learn about a new culture, and share a bit about life in the Adirondacks. Celia Evans was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to teach and conduct research in Siberia. She, and her two daughters, spent three months in Russia's Altai Republic studying primary school students' relationships to their environment, community and culture.

Evans, who also shared her love of folk music with her Russian hosts, told Todd Moe that she also wanted to find out how students in Siberia are learning about their natural world compared with students in the North Country.  Go to full article

Book review: "The Great Northern Express"

In the year he turned 65 and was treated for prostrate cancer, Vermont writer Howard Frank Mosher took a summer to travel around the country for a book tour, driving his twenty-year-old Chevy Celebrity. In 65 very short chapters, Mosher reflects on that trip and looks back to 1964, the first year he lived in Vermont's Northeast Kingdom. Betsy Kepes has this review of Mosher's new memoir, The Great Northern Express.  Go to full article
Bill and Brenda Gosse with cycle buddies Judy Geraghty and her husband Bob Weber
Bill and Brenda Gosse with cycle buddies Judy Geraghty and her husband Bob Weber

Cycling Ontario's Waterfront Trail: good friends, good times

Leaving Cornwall last Friday, Lucy Martin stopped for gas on Highway 2 just past Ingleside, overlooking the St. Lawrence River. She was about to leave when four heavily-laden cyclists pulled in for a rest.

The two couples are enjoying a 400-mile journey of exploration along Ontario's Waterfront Trail and setting a terrific example of fitness at any age.  Go to full article
CJHR volunteer Mary Alice Enright with Dai Bassett and Bill Parker
CJHR volunteer Mary Alice Enright with Dai Bassett and Bill Parker

"The People's voice" CJHR celebrates Ottawa Valley Heritage

All sorts of radio stations these days are busy blending old content with modern technology. Staying relevant, while reaching out to new listeners.

Take CJHR, a non-profit station in Renfrew, Ontario. "Valley Heritage Radio" serves up an eclectic mix for a mostly-rural audience. The format is at least half Canadian content, and about 20% of that is local. The station saves space for something called Ottawa Valley music, a country style influenced by Celtic and French roots, refined in lumber camps that once spanned the region.

Lucy Martin dropped by the CJHR booth at the Ottawa Valley Farm Show in March to hear how they're making community radio happen.  Go to full article
Furs traveled from the north via sled and bateau. Photos courtesy of the Hudson's Bay Company Archives
Furs traveled from the north via sled and bateau. Photos courtesy of the Hudson's Bay Company Archives

1919 film: "Treasures of the Far Fur Country"

In 1919, two intrepid cameramen left New York City to trek across the Canadian North. Traveling by foot, canoe, dog sled and icebreaker they filmed scenes from Hudson's Bay Company communities for that sponsor's upcoming 250th anniversary.

The finished two-hour movie was seen in Canada the following year. But once "talkies" took hold, interest in silent film faded. The original footage ended up tucked away in England, largely forgotten.

A collaborative project has been working to recover the film's source material for Canadians and the world. Some of the best segments will be shown April 3rd in a screening booked at the Canadian Museum of Civilization.

To learn more, Lucy Martin reached filmmaker and event organizer Kevin Nikkel in Winnipeg.  Go to full article

Congressional Republicans look to privatize Amtrak's Northeast Corridor

A Republican idea in Congress would change passenger rail service in the U.S. in the name of developing high speed rail. It would start with the 400-plus mile northeast corridor that includes the Adirondack route, which makes stops in Plattsburgh and Rouses point.

The line passes through some of the most congested cities in America, it's the most traveled passenger rail route in America and it's owned and operated by Amtrak.

Republican John Mica, chairman of the House Transportation Committee, and other proponents of the plan would put the Northeast corridor up for bid by private-sector developers.

Washington DC Correspondent Ryan Morden has the details:  Go to full article
Truck equipped with the Clarkson University-developed drag reduction device, Trailer Tail.
Truck equipped with the Clarkson University-developed drag reduction device, Trailer Tail.

Better gas mileage for big trucks

The trailers you see on semi-trucks are great for packing and moving goods, but aren't good for fuel economy. As the Innovation Trail's Ryan Morden reports, researchers at Clarkson University have designed a product to reduce drag from those trailers and improve gas mileage.  Go to full article
Manotick Brass Ensemble: (l to r) Martin Luce, Christine Hansen, Bob Weaver, Harold Floysvik and Kaz Samujlo.
Manotick Brass Ensemble: (l to r) Martin Luce, Christine Hansen, Bob Weaver, Harold Floysvik and Kaz Samujlo.

Moving the World: Sharing a love of music in Cuba

Although it's just 90 miles from Florida, Cuba maintains closer diplomatic relations with Canada than the United States. Today, about half of Cuba's tourists are sun-starved Canadians.

Tomorrow, a group of Ontario musicians heads to the Caribbean. Members of the Manotick Brass Ensemble, in partnership with a local Cuban church, will visit Cuba for a series of free concerts. The Canadians are also donating musical instruments to a group of students in Cuba.

Lucy Martin spoke with one of the group's founders about the trip. Kazimier Samujlo says Cubans don't need any help when it comes to making music. But, he says, between the U.S. trade embargo and Cuba's own economic woes, it's tough to find decent band instruments.  Go to full article
Artist's rendering of maintenance hangar (Source:  Laurentian Aerospace)
Artist's rendering of maintenance hangar (Source: Laurentian Aerospace)

Pieces fall into place for Laurentian and Plattsburgh

A company called Laurentian Aerospace says it is ready to move forward with a project in Plattsburgh that would bring roughly 900 high-paying jobs to the city. The company announced on Friday that after years of effort, it had found a major investor, Verdant Capital Group, willing to back the 175-million dollar venture.

Laurentian now plans to build a maintenance facility at the site of the old Plattsburgh Air Force Base that would refurbish commercial jetliners. Brian Mann was in Plattsburgh for the announcement and has our story.  Go to full article

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