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News stories tagged with "trees"

Photo via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10153850682500702&set=a.10151455321020702.832469.566575701&type=1&theater">Clarinets for Conservation on Facebook</a>, used with permission
Photo via Clarinets for Conservation on Facebook, used with permission

Tree-saving clarinetists bring mission to Saranac Lake

This evening, a quartet on a mission will play the BluSeed Studios in Saranac Lake. C4C Quartet will raise money for Clarinets for Conservation, an organization clarinetist Michele Von Haugg founded with a goal to save the African Blackwood Tree, or 'Mpingo, in Tanzania. The wood is used to make musical instruments including the clarinet.

Over a the last few years, Von Haugg and other clarinetists have raised money to travel to Africa to teach music and plant hundreds of trees. She told Todd Moe that the students learn about sustainability, and that learning music benefits kids in much broader ways, too.  Go to full article
A mix of trees planted in April will give Empire Evergreen farm an idea of how well the new Turkish fir will thrive. Photo by Matt Martin, WSKG
A mix of trees planted in April will give Empire Evergreen farm an idea of how well the new Turkish fir will thrive. Photo by Matt Martin, WSKG

Christmas tree farm branches out to fight disease

Every year, Christmas tree farmers lose some of their crop to disease.

A fungus that attacks the root of the tree is well-established in many parts of the country. And it's more and more of a problem for New York tree farmers.

One tree farm in the Southern Tier is trying out a species of fir that seems to be more resistant to the disease.  Go to full article
Michele Von Haugg and <i>Clarinets for Conservation</i> member Scott Horsington joined music students at Korongoni Secondary School to plant 'Mpingo seedlings last summer. Photo: Clarinets for Conservation
Michele Von Haugg and Clarinets for Conservation member Scott Horsington joined music students at Korongoni Secondary School to plant 'Mpingo seedlings last summer. Photo: Clarinets for Conservation

Using music to save an endangered tree

Clarinetist Michele Von Haugg is on a mission to save a very important tree for a lot of musicians. She grew up near Saratoga Springs and is the founder of Clarinets for Conservation. Von Haugg will give a concert in Plattsburgh on Saturday night at the North Country Cultural Center for the Arts. Todd Moe talks with her about efforts to save the African Blackwood Tree, or 'Mpingo, in Tanzania. The wood is used to make musical instruments, like the clarinet.

Over a the last few years, Von Haugg and other clarinetists, have raised money to travel to Africa to teach music and plant hundreds of trees. She says the 'Mpingo wood is durable and very valuable.  Go to full article
Becky Harblin at work in her home studio in West Potsdam.  Photo: Todd Moe
Becky Harblin at work in her home studio in West Potsdam. Photo: Todd Moe

A passion for pastels

After years as a poet, sculptor, weaver and painter, West Potsdam artist Becky Harblin says she only recently discovered what may well be her real passion for art: pastels.

Originally from Peru, in the Champlain Valley, Harblin has traveled and lived around the country. She worked for The New Yorker magazine in the 80's but decided that a rural life was more fitting to her. She and her husband, Don, raise a small flock of sheep, veggies and herbs on their farm near Potsdam. Her love for plants and the environment has led her to embrace shamanism.

Harblin studied art in college, where she says she dabbled in pastels. It was just last summer that she took the brightly colored sticks of pure pigment more seriously. Todd Moe stopped by her home studio.  Go to full article
Mature apple tree before and after pruning. Photo: W. Lord, UNH Co-operative Extension
Mature apple tree before and after pruning. Photo: W. Lord, UNH Co-operative Extension

The science and art of pruning apple trees

Pruning apple trees can bring trepidation to gardeners, but pruning improves the tree's vigor and fruit production. If you have an apple tree in your backyard, now is the time to start thinking about pulling out the pruners. Todd Moe talks with horticulturist Amy Ivy, who says now is a great time to start planning for pruning in March and April. She has some tips for best way to prune apple trees - and why you should take the time to prune.  Go to full article
Sequoias can top 300 feet. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/henryalien/">henryalien</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Sequoias can top 300 feet. Photo: henryalien, CC some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Tree growth

Trees may live for hundreds, thousands of years, but there are limits on their growth. Trees can only move so much water, and only to a certain height. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss the hydrology of trees.  Go to full article
Hugh Newton inspects a vacuum pump system in his sugarbush near Parishville.
Hugh Newton inspects a vacuum pump system in his sugarbush near Parishville.

Maple syrup: a mud season harvest

The pails are up and the sap is flowing. Weather plays a large part in the making of maple syrup. Last year's early spring ended the syrup production season abruptly in some parts of the state. Entering this year's maple syrup season, which usually runs from early March to mid-April, maple producers are eager to put last year behind them. Todd Moe spoke with a couple of syrup producers who say conditions are ideal for the start of the North Country's sweetest season.  Go to full article

Creating a bit of spring indoors, even in winter

It's still too early for serious pruning outdoors. But horticulturist Amy Ivy has some tips for cutting younger branches from spring-flowering trees and forcing them into early bloom indoors, long before the trees outside are beginning to open their buds.  Go to full article

Time to think about trees

Martha Foley and horticulturist Amy Ivy have tips for nurturing small seedlings this spring.  Go to full article
Lauren and her potted tree. It will stay outdoors until Christmas Eve, when it will be brought in for 14 hours. Photo: Jennifer Guerra
Lauren and her potted tree. It will stay outdoors until Christmas Eve, when it will be brought in for 14 hours. Photo: Jennifer Guerra

O Christmas tree

It's the holidays... which for some of us means time to deck the halls with boughs of holly and, oh yeah, pick out a Christmas tree. We sent reporter Jennifer Guerra to find out which tree is greener - real or artificial.  Go to full article

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