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News stories tagged with "trees"

Russell Martin, Newton Falls, and other DEC forest technicians have hung 2,500 EAB traps across the North Country.
Russell Martin, Newton Falls, and other DEC forest technicians have hung 2,500 EAB traps across the North Country.

Inside purple boxes, a trap for an invader

If you've driven almost anywhere in the North Country this summer, you've probably seen those purple boxes hanging by the side of the road. They're traps for an invasive bug that threatens to decimate New York's ash trees, about 8% of the state's forests. The emerald ash borer was found in New York two months ago, in the western New York town of Randolph. Federal and state environment officials destroyed that stand of ash trees. And they've hung more than 5,000 of the purple traps, half in the North Country, to see if they find any more emerald ash borers. So far, they haven't. Russell Martin is a forest technician for the Department of Environmental Conservation. He lives in Newton Falls and he's logged more than 12,000 miles in a Chevy Venture van setting and checking on the purple traps. David Sommerstein joined Martin on an expedition off Route 11 between Canton and Potsdam.  Go to full article
The Emerald Ash borer..
The Emerald Ash borer..

Ash-chewing beetle joins the list of invasives hitting New York

Last week, New York's Conservation Department announced that yet another invasive species has arrived in the state. This one, the Emerald ash borer, could be devastating. Millions of trees have already been ravaged by the tiny, green beetle, from Michigan to southern Canada. Brian Mann spoke with Robert Davies, head of the DEC Division of Lands and Forests.  Go to full article

April is last-minute pruning time

Buds are swelling on trees around the region, but there is still time to prune this month. Martha Foley chats with horticulturist Amy Ivy about another early spring garden chore.  Go to full article
Tim Driscoll (left) and Eldon Lindsay talk shop while boiling sap.
Tim Driscoll (left) and Eldon Lindsay talk shop while boiling sap.

A sweet year at the sugar shack

Right around now, anyone with a sugar bush is busy with the business of turning maple sap into syrup. It's a familiar rite of spring for many, and a delightful discovery for others. Tim Driscoll has been helping one friend or another with syrup season since childhood. About a dozen years ago, Tim and some of his old pals decided to revive a neglected sugar bush on the edge of Eldon Lindsay's dairy farm, in Kars, Ontario. They built a very simple sugar shack out of recycled barn board -- a grizzled clubhouse in the woods. The four friends sell just enough syrup to cover their costs. It's where sap boils away amid tall trees and quiet beauty. Ottawa reporter Lucy Martin dropped by to sample fresh sap, syrup and stories.  Go to full article

Bringing spring indoors

Martha Foley and horticulturist Amy Ivy share tips and ideas on forcing birch, cherry and maple cuttings to bloom indoors this season.  Go to full article

A backyard plan to help keep winter winds out

There's still plenty of winter ahead. Martha Foley and horticulturist Amy Ivy talk about plans for the yard that include evergreens to help diminish winter winds.  Go to full article

Tips for finding the ideal Christmas Tree

Martha Foley talks with horticulturist Amy Ivy for finding the freshest Christmas tree and ideas for alternatives to a traditional tree.  Go to full article
A bog near Blue Mountain Lake, part of the Finch Pruyn timber easement
A bog near Blue Mountain Lake, part of the Finch Pruyn timber easement

Carnivorous pitcher plants and rolling thunder grace an ancient Adirondack bog

Huge conservation deals over the last decade have protected nearly a million acres of land in the Adirondacks. The deals allow timber harvesting to continue. But scientists say they also protect crucial habitats and eco-systems. In part two of his report on the Finch, Pruyn easement negotiated by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy Brian Mann sends an audio postcard from a bog near Blue Mountain Lake.  Go to full article

Adirondack-based school will study northern forests

Plans for an Adirondack-based leadership and training institute focused on the northern forest were announced Tuesday by state Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Pete Grannis. The Northern Forest Institute for Conservation, Education and Leadership Training will be located in Newcomb and run by the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Chris Knight reports.  Go to full article

More garden basics: What?s bugging you?

Garden pests are a fact of life. But there are ways to keep them under control. Horticulturist Amy Ivy has some tips. She spoke with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

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