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News stories tagged with "trudeau"

Trudeau staff moving on

The Trudeau Institute has lost two of its top researchers and about a dozen other scientists. Dr. Frances Lund and Dr. Troy Randall, senior faculty members at the Saranac Lake biomedical research lab, are moving to the University of Riochester Medical Center. As Chris Knight reports, officials at the institute say the search for replacements in already underway.  Go to full article
EL Trudeau honored with new "Distinguished Americans" stamp (Source: USPS)
EL Trudeau honored with new "Distinguished Americans" stamp (Source: USPS)

Saranac Lake TB pioneer EL Trudeau honored with "Distinguished Americans" stamp

Yesterday in Saranac Lake, the US Postal Service unveiled a new stamp honoring Dr. Edward Livingston Trudeau. Trudeau was a pioneering physician and tuberculosis researcher. But he was also invented the community of Saranac Lake, which remains the biggest community in the Adirondacks. Trudeau's sanatorium closed a half-century ago, but as Brian Mann reports, his work continues to echo through American culture.  Go to full article
Norwegian explorer and photographer Carl Lumholtz
Norwegian explorer and photographer Carl Lumholtz

Saranac Lake's TB history includes famous Norwegian explorer

Next week, the U.S. Postal Service will unveil a new stamp honoring Saranac Lake's Edward Livingston Trudeau. Trudeau did pioneering research in tuberculosis care. His sanatorium attracted patients from all over the world. One of the more famous patients was a Norwegian explorer and anthropologist named Carl Lumholtz. Lumholtz came to Saranac Lake at the end of his life, in the 1920s, after leading expeditions to Australia, Mexico, and the South Pacific. Brian Mann spoke about Lumholtz with Norwegian journalist Morten Andrea Stroksnes. Stroksnes was in the Adirondacks recently researching a new biography of Lumholtz.  Go to full article

Trudeau Institute names new director

After twelve years, Dr. Susie Swain is stepping aside as director of the Trudeau Institute. The research lab in Saranac Lake does basic research into the human immune system. Last week, scientists at Trudeau won a hundred-thousand dollar grant from New York state to take part in a new stem-cell research project. Dr. David Woodland is the Trudeau Institute's new director. He told Brian Mann that the next five years will bring major expansion of staff and laboratories.  Go to full article

Trudeau and navy working on flu vaccine

Scientists from Saranac Lake's Trudeau Institute and the U.S. Navy will be working together to develop a pandemic influenza vaccine. The defense appropriations bill signed into law this week by President Bush includes $1.6 million over two years for the research, which is meant to benefit both the general population and the military. Chris Knight reports.  Go to full article

Trudeau breaks ground on expansion project

A ceremonial groundbreaking took place Monday for a new research wing at the Trudeau Institute in Saranac Lake named in honor of late State Senator Ronald Stafford. The $10 million project will add 10,000 square feet onto the existing biomedical research facility. As Chris Knight reports, Trudeau officials say the expansion will help them continue their fight against infectious diseases like bird flu.  Go to full article

Girl Scouts to Combine Area Councils

Girl Scouts of the North Country is planning to join forces with three surrounding councils. The North Country council - headquartered in Plattsburgh - now serves all of Franklin and Clinton Counties and parts of St Lawrence, Hamilton and Essex Counties. The new mega-council will encompass 16 counties with nearly 20,000 scouts. Douglas Hopper has the story.  Go to full article
Avian flu has made headlines globally (Source:  Nature Magazine
Avian flu has made headlines globally (Source: Nature Magazine

Influenza a Global Risk: One Town Plans Ahead

Avian influenza is still extremely rare. Fewer than a hundred people have died worldwide. But many scientists worry that the risk of a deadly influenza strain spreading among humans has been growing. A full-blown pandemic could quickly overwhelm America's medical infrastructure, especially in rural areas. In Saranac Lake, an informal group of scientists, county health officials, and hospital workers began meeting last fall. As Brian Mann reports, they say an avian flu outbreak will require a community response that goes well beyond the hospital door. This report first aired in October 2005.  Go to full article
Avian flu has made headlines globally (Source:  Nature Magazine
Avian flu has made headlines globally (Source: Nature Magazine

Influenza a Global Risk: One Town Plans Ahead

Avian flu has pushed its way to the forefront as a global health concern. Yesterday, the US Senate voted unanimously to boost funding for avian flu research and planning. The disease is still extremely rare. Less than a hundred people have died worldwide. But many scientists worry that the risk of a deadly influenza strain spreading among humans has been growing. While avian flu is a global health threat, experts say the burden of responding to an outbreak could fall most heavily on local governments, along with local doctors and nurses. In Saranac Lake, an informal group of scientists, county health officials, and hospital workers has begun meeting. As Brian Mann reports, they hope to develop a plan for avian flu response that could include quarantines and emergency shelters for sick patients.  Go to full article
Dr. Suzi Swain (Source: Trudeau Institute
Dr. Suzi Swain (Source: Trudeau Institute

Avian Flu Could Overwhelm Region's Healthcare

Global health officials are tracking the spread of avian flu in birds. They worry that a deadly strain of influenza could mutate and begin to spread aggressively among humans. There have already been dozens of cases where the disease made the leap from birds to people and in extremely rare instances the avian flu appears to have passed between humans. More than a hundred and twenty people have been infected so far, most of them in Asia. Nearly half died. This morning in the first part of our series on the local response to avian flu, we talk with Dr. Suzi Swain. Dr. Swain heads the Trudeau Institute, in Saranac Lake, one of the premier research facilities in the country investigating infectious and respiratory diseases. She's been meeting with local healthcare providers, who are preparing a response plan for the Tri-lakes area. Dr. Swain spoke with Brian Mann.

Note: Tomorrow during the 8 O'clock Hour, Brian reports looks at how one North Country community might respond if a flu pandemic occurs.  Go to full article

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