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News stories tagged with "tuberculosis"

Historic Aiden Lair.  Photo: Andy Flynn
Historic Aiden Lair. Photo: Andy Flynn

Adirondack Attic: Aiden Lair

We continue our series, the Adirondack Attic, with Andy Flynn. NCPR is collaborating with Andy and his sources at the Adirondack Museum and other historical associations and museums in the region to bring local history stories to air.

Today, Andy talks with at Adirondack Architectural Heritage director Steven Engelhart about an endangered historic property in the Adirondacks -- Aiden Lair. It's located in the town of Minerva, and was one of the way stations Teddy Roosevelt used during his night ride to the presidency in 1901.  Go to full article
A chessboard from the Gabriels Sanatorium.  Photo: Adirondack Museum
A chessboard from the Gabriels Sanatorium. Photo: Adirondack Museum

Adirondack Attic: 1920s chess champs at Gabriels Sanatorium

We continue our series, the Adirondack Attic, with Andy Flynn. NCPR is collaborating with Andy and his sources at the Adirondack Museum and other historical associations and museums in the region to bring local history stories to air.

Today, Andy Flynn visits the Adirondack Museum for a closer look at a chessboard from the Gabriels Sanatorium that dates from the 1920s.  Go to full article
Trudeau Institute director David Woodland
Trudeau Institute director David Woodland

Trudeau Institute drives Saranac Lake?s booming bio-tech economy

It's been a tough year for the North Country economy. Government agencies have implemented hiring freezes. Many local firms have trimmed staff. Unemployment in many parts of the region tops ten percent, running well above the state and national averages. But in Saranac Lake, one bright spot is the expansion of Trudeau Institute. The research lab founded in the 1880s to battle tuberculosis has reinvented itself as one of the top science institute's in the country studying the human immune system. Now Trudeau is adding new jobs and preparing to open a massive new laboratory. Brian Mann has part one of our series on Trudeau's history and its impact in the North Country.  Go to full article
EL Trudeau honored with new "Distinguished Americans" stamp (Source: USPS)
EL Trudeau honored with new "Distinguished Americans" stamp (Source: USPS)

Saranac Lake TB pioneer EL Trudeau honored with "Distinguished Americans" stamp

Yesterday in Saranac Lake, the US Postal Service unveiled a new stamp honoring Dr. Edward Livingston Trudeau. Trudeau was a pioneering physician and tuberculosis researcher. But he was also invented the community of Saranac Lake, which remains the biggest community in the Adirondacks. Trudeau's sanatorium closed a half-century ago, but as Brian Mann reports, his work continues to echo through American culture.  Go to full article
Norwegian explorer and photographer Carl Lumholtz
Norwegian explorer and photographer Carl Lumholtz

Saranac Lake's TB history includes famous Norwegian explorer

Next week, the U.S. Postal Service will unveil a new stamp honoring Saranac Lake's Edward Livingston Trudeau. Trudeau did pioneering research in tuberculosis care. His sanatorium attracted patients from all over the world. One of the more famous patients was a Norwegian explorer and anthropologist named Carl Lumholtz. Lumholtz came to Saranac Lake at the end of his life, in the 1920s, after leading expeditions to Australia, Mexico, and the South Pacific. Brian Mann spoke about Lumholtz with Norwegian journalist Morten Andrea Stroksnes. Stroksnes was in the Adirondacks recently researching a new biography of Lumholtz.  Go to full article

Border guard in TB scandal steps down

Federal officials say a border officer who waved a man with a dangerous strain of tuberculosis through the Champlain crossing north of Plattsburgh has "retired." As Brian Mann reports, the officer had been widely criticized by the media and by officials within the Department of Homeland Security.  Go to full article

More Champlain officers knew about TB carrier crossing border; alarm sounded twice

The federal customs officer who allowed a man with a dangerous strain of tuberculosis into the U.S. has been placed on administrative leave. But officials with the Department of Homeland Security now say that more than one officer at the Champlain crossing north of Plattsburgh was warned that Andrew Speaker was crossing the border. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Probes underway into North Country TB border lapse

Federal officials say a border agent in Champlain, north of Plattsburgh, has been reassigned after allowing a man with a dangerous strain of tuberculosis into the US. The Department of Homeland Security has begun an investigation into the apparent lapse. Senator Charles Schumer is now calling for an independent probe. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

Latin American Culture In A Northern Village:

For decades, hope for a tuberculosis cure lured patients to Saranac Lake from all ove the world. Spanish teacher and amateur historian Amy Catania has written about the experience of patients from Latin America. She spoke with Brian Mann.  Go to full article

Canadian Border Guards Near Plattsburgh Exposed to Tuberculosis: Health Officials Say Case Poses No Public Risk

Five Canadian workers at the Champlain border crossing, north of Plattsburgh, have been infected with tuberculosis. Officials say the source was a refugee, detained at the border for several days. As Brian Mann reports, dozens of travelers may have been exposed, but north country health officials say there's no cause for alarm.
Update: A spokesman for the US Customs service says there've been no recent cases of TB exposure among American border agents. Mike McMullen says infectious diseases are a well-known hazard for workers at the border. Testing and vaccinations are offered regularly. According to McMullen, the recent case won't affect safety procedures at the Champlain crossing.  Go to full article

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