Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "turtles"

A turtle under the ice. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/90434877@N00/3206736457/">Richard Due</a>. Creative COmmons, some rights reserved
A turtle under the ice. Photo: Richard Due. Creative COmmons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: How do turtles survive a winter underwater?

Unlike frogs, turtles don't hibernate through the winter. In fact, sometimes you can see snappers and other species moving around under the ice. While their metabolism runs at very low ebb in the cold, they remain alert to changes in light and temperature that signal the coming spring.

How do they survive without oxygen? As Paul Smiths College biologist Curt Stager tells Martha Foley, they get energy from their body tissues, and their shells neutralize the resulting lactic acid build-up.  Go to full article
Snapping turtle crossing the road. Photo: Matt Foley (submitted to NCPR's Hurricane Irene album)
Snapping turtle crossing the road. Photo: Matt Foley (submitted to NCPR's Hurricane Irene album)

Natural Selections: Turtles

Snapping turtles aren't really that vicious, unless they are provoked. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about their peculiar anatomy, safe ways (for turtle and human) to help them across highways, and more.  Go to full article

Professor studies threatened turtles in Jefferson County

Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties are among the few places in New York state home to threatened Blanding's turtles, sometimes called box turtles. SUNY Potsdam professor Glenn Johnson is studying the turtles there this summer, along with his student assistants. Joanna Richards went out in the field with them and has this report.  Go to full article

Turtle Numbers Down; Trapping Banned

Many Great Lakes states are taking steps to protect turtles. There's a big demand for turtles in Asia and Europe. But too much trapping can damage wild turtle populations. As a result, states are placing bans or restrictions on turtle trapping. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Dan Gunderson reports.  Go to full article

1-4 of 4