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News stories tagged with "university"

Paul Smiths College President John Mills in his office on Tuesday, shortly after announcing major job cuts at the school.  Photo:  Brian Mann
Paul Smiths College President John Mills in his office on Tuesday, shortly after announcing major job cuts at the school. Photo: Brian Mann

Updated: Paul Smiths College cuts 12% of staff, faculty

Facing declining enrollments and rising costs, Paul Smiths College in the Adirondacks today announced that roughly 12 percent of faculty and staff will be let go. College President John Mills (click "Listen" to hear Brian Mann's interview with Mills) says the "restructuring" plan involves the loss of 23 full- and part-time positions. "I am deeply saddened that we must let go of several people as we restructure our operations," Mills said on Tuesday.

In all, 11 staff and faculty will be laid off, while 12 more jobs will be cut from open positions or people who "have left the college voluntarily."  Go to full article
Montreal police have struggled to cope with three months of continuing demonstrations. Photo: Monica Eileen Patterson
Montreal police have struggled to cope with three months of continuing demonstrations. Photo: Monica Eileen Patterson

In Montreal, student protests target Quebec's Liberal government

Massive demonstrations in the city of Montreal have continued for more than a hundred straight days.

The protest began when Quebec's Liberal Party tried to hike tuition rates for college students. But the sometimes violent street rallies have exploded into a much wider debate in French Canada over civil liberties and the future of popular social programs.

As Brian Mann reports, some students are now calling for the resignation of Quebec's premier.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: Having a ball at Clarkson

Clarkson University students were having a ball in Potsdam recently. Actually, they spent more than an hour moving a huge earthen ball across town to Clarkson's main campus. Our news intern Chelsea Ross stumbled upon the Moving the World event and sent this Heard Up North.  Go to full article
SLU grounds manager Marcus Sherburne stands by a new "no-mow" zone.  Inside the white line, they'll stop mowing, savings thousands of gallons of gasoline.
SLU grounds manager Marcus Sherburne stands by a new "no-mow" zone. Inside the white line, they'll stop mowing, savings thousands of gallons of gasoline.

SLU groundskeeping goes green

In the ultra-competitive world of college admissions, a university can live or die by how it looks. The grounds are a huge part of sealing the deal for prospective students and parents. But universities are also trying to save money and reduce their impact on the environment. Tonight at 7, St. Lawrence University hosts a discussion about sustainable groundskeeping. One of the featured speakers is SLU grounds manager, Marcus Sherburne. Sherburne has sculpted golf courses and universities for more than a decade. In the last few years, he's begun changing his practices to reduce energy and use less pesticides and fertilizers. Sherburne took David Sommerstein for a ride in his four-wheeler to show him the difference.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: Sorority sisters have left the building

Springtime means a lot of things in the North Country. But in college towns like Plattsburgh or Burlington or Canton or Potsdam, it means the seniors are getting ready to graduate. And they're making sure everyone knows. David Sommerstein came across a gaggle of celebrating sorority sisters on the streets of Potsdam for this Heard Up North.  Go to full article

A Year of Hard Choices: Graduating into a receding industry

It's hard for anyone to find a job in today's economy. Recent college graduates with little real-world experience are finding it especially tough. And then there's people like Sarah Minor. Sarah graduated from Syracuse University last summer with a degree in photojournalism. She wants to get a job at a newspaper at a time when that industry is in freefall. Sarah's living with her parents outside Canton while she searches. She produced this audio diary for our series, The Year of Hard Choices.  Go to full article
SLU student Adam Falcon died after a night of drinking in 2004 (Source: SLU website)
SLU student Adam Falcon died after a night of drinking in 2004 (Source: SLU website)

North Country colleges confront "gray zone" between alcohol and adulthood

Paul Smiths College has drawn criticism in recent weeks, following the alcohol-related deaths of two students in May. But academic and law enforcement officials across the region say the problem of underage drinking is complicated, with few easy answers. In the final part of our series on alcohol and campus safety, Brian Mann reports that the debate often winds up in a legal and ethical gray zone.  Go to full article

Contract dispute remains ugly at Clarkson

Unionized workers opened a new front yesterday in their contract dispute with Clarkson University. The Civil Service Employees Union launched a website detailing their opposition to last summer's contract offer. The two sides are about $40,000 apart, or roughly the price of tuition, books, room and board for one student. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Trustees to Vote on King's Appointment as SUNY Potsdam President

Today the SUNY Board of Trustees will decide the next step for departing chancellor Robert King. His severance plan calls for him to get a 206-thousand-dollar-a-year SUNY professorship and become interim president at Potsdam College. Some faculty feel that deal's too generous.  Go to full article
No. 50 Bob Cowser, on the bench (above) and in the game.
No. 50 Bob Cowser, on the bench (above) and in the game.

Dream Season: St. Lawrence Professor Plays Semi-Pro Football

Superbowl weekend is upon us. For most football fans, this is a time for armchair quarterbacking in the purest sense of the word. We shout at the referees and the coaches and the players, but most of us have never worn a uniform or taken a hit from a 250-pound lineman. St. Lawrence University English professor Bob Cowser has written a book, called "Dream Season: A College Professor Joins America's Oldest Semi-professional Football Team" about his experience, returning to football in middle age. Cowser played defensive end in 2001 for the Watertown Red and Black, the oldest semi-pro team in the country, and a dominant force in the Empire Football League. After his season with the Watertown Red and Black, Cowser helped to co-found a new semi-pro team, the St. Lawrence Valley Trailblazers. He spoke with Brian Mann about the realities - and the subtleties - of playing a violent sport.  Go to full article

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