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News stories tagged with "vanishing-youth"

Kids in the Indian Lake Central School in Hamilton County (Photo:  George DeChant)
Kids in the Indian Lake Central School in Hamilton County (Photo: George DeChant)

Vanishing Youth: Can the North Country resist a national tide?

This week, we've begun on on-going series called Vanishing Youth, looking at the aging of North Country counties, and the loss of young people and families who are choosing to move outside the region.

Many communities in this part of New York state are already far older than the state average. Researchers say our counties will grow even grayer in the decades ahead, with broad implications for the economy and the cultural life of the North Country.

This issue can be emotional, and it is often tangled up in local political issues. But the trend is evident across most of rural America. Brian Mann spoke with Ken Johnson, senior Demographer at the Carsey Institute, a rural policy institute in New Hampshire.

Johnson says small towns across the US are grappling with, and trying to survive, some painful trends.  Go to full article
Tim Morse loved life in Chicago, where attractions like the Cloud Gate sculpture are all around (Photos provided)
Tim Morse loved life in Chicago, where attractions like the Cloud Gate sculpture are all around (Photos provided)

Vanishing Youth: Why do some young people stay?

This week, we're beginning an on-going series looking at the future of the North Country from the perspective of young people. New research from Cornell University shows counties in our region continuing to age, with fewer young families, fewer young professionals and fewer kids.

In the weeks ahead, we'll be looking at this problem from a lot of different angles. Today, Brian Mann talks with Tim Morse, a North Country native who made a different choice, returning and making a career in the region.

Tim, who is 26 years old, arrived back home earlier this month, leaving Chicago to take a job at SUNY Potsdam. He spoke with Brian right after getting off the road.  Go to full article
Becca Johnson at her office in Manhattan (Photos provided by Becca Johnson and Mark Scarlett)
Becca Johnson at her office in Manhattan (Photos provided by Becca Johnson and Mark Scarlett)

Vanishing Youth: Why do young people choose to leave the North Country?

This morning, we begin on an on-going series, looking at the problem of young people in the North Country. Across the US, rural towns and villages face a dangerous drain of young people who are moving away, choosing a different way of life in cities and suburbs.

The exodus of twenty- and thirty-somethings has huge implications for community life, reshaping the economy, shrinking schools, making it harder to sustain volunteer fire departments and other basic services.

In the days and weeks ahead, we'll be looking at this challenge from many different angles, hearing many different voices.

But we begin with Brian Mann's story of one young woman who grew up in Rossie, in the St. Lawrence Valley, but chose to live and raise her family far away from the North Country.  Go to full article

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