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News stories tagged with "visa"

Juan Carlos (left) lives in a converted farm office in the barn of this dairy farm. He and Freddy want to be able to go home and come back to work on dairy farms here. Photo: David Sommerstein
Juan Carlos (left) lives in a converted farm office in the barn of this dairy farm. He and Freddy want to be able to go home and come back to work on dairy farms here. Photo: David Sommerstein

What undocumented dairy workers think of immigration reform

Dairy farmers - and their workers - have a lot at stake in the immigration debate underway in Washington.

A survey by Cornell University found that 2,600 Spanish-speaking people work on New York dairy farms. Of them, two thirds or more are here illegally. That's in part because there's no visa program for the kind of year-round workers dairy farms need.

The Senate's reform plan offers dairy farms new options for a legal supply of immigrant labor.

Undocumented Latino workers are scattered on bunches of dairy farms in the North Country. David Sommerstein spoke with some of them to see what they think of immigration reform.  Go to full article
Image: Veronica200626 via WXXI
Image: Veronica200626 via WXXI

Will the US follow Canada's entrepreneur visa lead?

Canada is aiming to woo bright young entrepreneurs with a startup visa program. The scheme offers immediate permanent residence to foreign nationals who are able to secure business funding from Canadian investors. But, there are mixed feelings in the US about the benefits of following suit.

Introduced on April 1, the pilot program will have an initial annual allotment of almost 3,000 visas for entrepreneurs who secure at least $200,000 from Canadian venture capital funds or $75,000 from a private investor.  Go to full article
Immigration lawyer Hilary Fraser
Immigration lawyer Hilary Fraser

Immigration bureaucracy lands legal residents in detention

One wrinkle in the immigration picture has been particularly difficult for foreign students and professionals working in the U.S.

There are two agencies within Homeland Security that handle visas. The one that issues them is U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. It says a foreign national may reapply or change a visa status "in a timely manner" before its expiration date. The visa itself may take weeks or months to process. The U.S. Border Patrol however, only looks at the expiration date.

If a person's visa has expired, that person is subject to detention. Immigration lawyer Hilary Fraser of Ithaca has defended clients caught between these two interpretations of the law. She told David Sommerstein one was a Filipino national living in Watertown.  Go to full article

Feeling the Chill: International Students in the North Country, part 2

In the next two weeks, the north country's colleges and universities will empty out as students head home for the winter break. For international students, the holiday offers a rare chance to visit with family in their home countries. But this year, many foreign students are afraid to make the trip. As Brian Mann reports, they fear that US immigration officials won't let them back into the country.  Go to full article

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