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News stories tagged with "wanakena"

Photo: Zach Hirsch
Photo: Zach Hirsch

Iconic footbridge needs "complete rebuild"

This week's warm weather might have been nice for those who enjoy shedding a few layers. But rapidly thawing ice creates all sorts of problems.

On Monday, a beloved footbridge in Wanakena got hit hard when an ice jam came roaring down the Oswegatchie River. There aren't many of these footbridges in New York, and residents of the small community are upset.  Go to full article
Annette and Sherman Craig retired to the Adirondacks, volunteering and forming a woodworking business. Photo: Brian Mann
Annette and Sherman Craig retired to the Adirondacks, volunteering and forming a woodworking business. Photo: Brian Mann

Woodworking and activism in the shadow of a shuttered mill

This summer, North Country Public Radio has been reporting on the final closure of the paper mill in Newton Falls. A Canadian firm has auctioned off the mill's equipment and is looking for a buyer for the land and buildings.

It's an old story in our region, as factories, mines, and mills have closed or moved overseas. One big question for places like southern St. Lawrence County is - what next? What will the next economy look like?

This morning, Brian Mann profiles Sherman and Annette Craig, owners of Wanakena Woodworks.

They're artisan furniture makers and community activists who hope that their kind of investment can help revitalize struggling corners of the Park.  Go to full article
Part of a 47-foot mural painted for the school's centennial by alumnus Barry Nehr. It's on display this weekend. Photo: Todd Moe
Part of a 47-foot mural painted for the school's centennial by alumnus Barry Nehr. It's on display this weekend. Photo: Todd Moe

Preview: Forestry Festival in Wanakena

A century of life in the woods is the theme of the Forestry Festival at the Ranger School in Wanakena this weekend. The school is celebrating its centennial. Todd Moe spoke with director Christopher Westbrook about the festival.  Go to full article
A miniature locomotive crosses Bob Meredith's handmade truss bridge. Photo: Todd Moe
A miniature locomotive crosses Bob Meredith's handmade truss bridge. Photo: Todd Moe

Heard Up North: more than a toy railroad

The logging railroads are gone and most of the sawmills in the northwestern Adirondacks have closed over the last century. But a group of model railroad buffs in Star Lake is building a miniature train exhibit that will explore the history of logging and life a hundred years ago.

Along with mountains, trees and houses, the minutely detailed diorama comes complete with Wanakena's historic foot bridge, Rich Lumber Company sawmills and even a steamboat named "Helen". Most of the exhibit is being built from scratch based on historic photos and memories. The finished layout will be permanently displayed in Star Lake.

Bob Meredith and Ted Tate donned their engineer caps and gave Todd Moe a tour of their miniature work-in-progress for today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Gail and Bob Simmons are among the year-round and seasonal Wanakenans profiled in Kristin Rehder's photo exhibition, <i>The Way to Wanakena</i>, at the Ranger School through September 30th.
Gail and Bob Simmons are among the year-round and seasonal Wanakenans profiled in Kristin Rehder's photo exhibition, The Way to Wanakena, at the Ranger School through September 30th.

Photographer captures Wanakena's community spirit

Using images and text, a new photography exhibit explores the meaning of community and small town life in the northern Adirondacks. The Way to Wanakena is the thesis project of seasonal resident Kristin Rehder, a graduate student at Skidmore College. Her photos are on display at the Ranger School through September 30th.

Rehder told Todd Moe that she's a writer by profession who is also a "passionate photographer" who uses the camera to help her "learn something about the world." Her exhibit is in the tradition of social-activist photography. Rehder says she fell in love with Wanakena during her first visit eleven years ago.  Go to full article
A view of the Oswegatchie from the front entrance of the Ranger School.
A view of the Oswegatchie from the front entrance of the Ranger School.

Teaching forestry since its first bloom

The Ranger School in Wanakena celebrates its centennial this year. Since 1912, the school has been a regional campus of the New York State College of Forestry in Syracuse. It's the oldest forest technology school in the country. The centennial celebration officially kicks off this weekend with music, food and alumni gatherings. And a new book, published as part of its centennial, includes the history of the school along with alumni essays and photos.

Todd Moe talks with the school's director, Christopher Westbrook and Brad Woodward, chair of the centennial committee about the book, The Ranger School: A Century in the Forest, and the school's history of training forest rangers in the Adirondacks.  Go to full article

Preview: Jamie Savage's latest cd "Back to Nature"

Adirondack singer-songwriter Jamie Savage celebrates the release of his third cd, Back to Nature, at TAUNY in Canton tonight (7 o'clock). His newest album is an acoustic celebration of the beauty, culture and natural history of the Adirondacks. He joined Todd Moe in the studio this morning for music and conversation.  Go to full article

In celebration of trails

This Saturday marks the 17th annual National Trails Day. It's an opportunity for the public and trail enthusiasts to explore and celebrate the nation's trail system. In the Cranberry Lake area this Saturday, volunteers will work on nine different trail projects, and the new "Cranberry Lake 50" loop trail around the lake will officially open. Jamie Savage is a local singer/songwriter who also teaches at the Ranger School in Wanakena. He told Todd Moe more about National Trails Day.  Go to full article
Jamie at the 2007 Adirondack Folk Festival, Schroon Lake
Jamie at the 2007 Adirondack Folk Festival, Schroon Lake

Music: Adk singer/songwriter Jamie Savage

Singer/songwriter Jamie Savage says his love for nature and the culture of the Adirondacks inspires his music. Savage is an experienced climber who's traveled to many mountain ranges though he feels the Adirondacks are the most beautiful. He teaches at the ranger school in Wanakena. His music has been heard in coffee houses and on concert stages from Watertown to Burlington, and he was one of the musicians featured in NCPR's UpNorth Music Project last year. Jamie Savage joins Todd Moe in the studio to talk about his recently released second recording, "Hey Music."  Go to full article
Fall view of the bridge taken by Photo of the Day contributor Patricia Lincourt, Wanakena.
Fall view of the bridge taken by Photo of the Day contributor Patricia Lincourt, Wanakena.

Very Special Place: Wanakena Foot Bridge

The largest suspension footbridge in the United States is located in a tiny Adirondack hamlet with just a half dozen year-round families. Located in southern St. Lawrence County, Wanakena is probably best known as the home of the New York State ranger School. But for many people it just isn't summer until they've walked the 171 feet from one end of the bridge to the other and dipped their toe in the Oswegatchie River. Today NCPR and TAUNY, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, continue our look at some very special places in the North Country. Varrick Chittenden made several trips to the footbridge this past summer and talked with folks who have a soft spot for the bridge and the town. Varrick and Joel Hurd recently talked about the bridge and its importance, past and present, in the northwestern Adirondacks.  Go to full article

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