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News stories tagged with "water-pollution"

New Limits on Pesticides in Drinking Water?

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is reviewing how much of a commonly used pesticide it will allow in drinking water. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports.  Go to full article
Kevin Sullivan's greener pastures.
Kevin Sullivan's greener pastures.

Seasonal Dairying: A Viable Alternative

Most dairy farmers in the North Country milk their cows all year long. It brings in a steady paycheck and ensures a steady flow of milk to manufacturing plants. But a small but growing number give their cows a break during the coldest months. It's a technique called seasonal dairying. Its supporters say it's gentler on the cows, easier on the environment, and gives small dairy farms a future in an industry that's growing ever bigger. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Native Americans Weigh Contaminated Fish Risks

There's a trend among some Native Americans. They're trying to return to more traditional diets. Many believe various health problems among indian populations are due, in part, to adopting a diet much heavier in sugars, starches and fats then their ancestors diets. But they're concerned that pollution has tainted any of the traditional foods, such as fish. The Great Lakes radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports on communicating the risks of eating contaminated fish to ethnics groups.  Go to full article

Protecting Children From Tainted Fish

The people most at risk from contaminants in fish often don't know it. Different chemicals found in fish from many inland lakes, including the Great Lakes, can be harmful to human development. State governments issue fish consumption advisories that recommend limiting eating such fish. the Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports that not everyone learns of the advisories.  Go to full article

Lake George: Herbicide Use Rejected By Park Agency Committee

A key committee of the Adirondack Park Agency has rejected plans to use a chemical herbicide in Lake George. Meeting yesterday, the Agency effectively killed efforts to use SONAR to fight an invasive plant species. As Brian Mann reports, pro-environment groups praised the decision, while local residents reacted with fury.  Go to full article

The Complexities of Issuing Fish Advisories

There are three major questions often asked when considering the environmental health of a body of water. Can you drink the water? Can you swim in it? And, can you eat the fish? Often the answer to the last question is very complicated. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports.  Go to full article

NAFTA & Environment: Mixed Results

In 1994, the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, established an agency to monitor the environmental effects of trade between the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. In a new report, the agency gives NAFTA mixed reviews. David Sommerstein explains.  Go to full article

Lake George: Bitter Debate Over Plan To Use Chemical

The Adirondack Park Agency has delayed a final vote on the use of a chemical herbicide in Lake George. Many locals hope the chemical "Sonar" will kill an invasive plant species called Eurasian watermilfoil. But Park Agency staff oppose the plan. As Brian Mann reports, the debate has turned ugly, with Lake George residents promising to lobby Governor Pataki.

Tuesday during regional news, we'll take the sonar question out onto the waters of Lake George, revisiting a summer trip to a bay that's infested with Eurasian watermilfoil.  Go to full article

Canada Wants Changes To Seaway Study?

David Sommerstein talks with John Birnbaum, executive director of the Georgian Bay Association in Ontario, who says he received assurances from Canada's Transport Minister David Collinette that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers study of the St. Lawrence seaway needs some changes to be acceptable to Canada.  Go to full article

Farm Pollution Researchers Threatened

Some scientists are being threatened because they're investigating pollution from farms. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports.  Go to full article

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