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News stories tagged with "water-pollution"

Slowing the Spread of Non-native Species

In the North Country, we often hear about non-native invasive species that are spreading in our lakes and rivers. Zebra mussels and Eurasian watermilfoil have been problems here for years. Now, a new effort is underway to slow invasive species that are arriving by land. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

Biological Wastewater Treatment

Cleaning up the water we flush down the drain usually means sending it through sewer pipes to sophisticated and expensive municipal wastewater plants. But a new method of cleaning up wastewater begins and ends at the same place. And instead of using chemicals and machinery, it uses plants and animals. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports.  Go to full article

America's Largest Superfund Site: The Hudson River, Part 3

In the final part of our series on PCB contamination in the Hudson River, Brian Mann looks at the damage to the environment...and at GE's claim that the river is slowly cleaning itself.  Go to full article

America?s Largest Superfund Site: The Hudson River, Part 2

This summer, the Environmental Protection Agency will decide whether tons of PCBs should be dredged from the Hudson River. At the center of the debate are questions about the chemical's affect on human health. In this second part of our series on the Hudson River, Brian Mann looks at the volatile mix of science and public opinion that will shape the EPA's decision.  Go to full article

America's Largest Superfund Site: The Hudson River, Pt. 1

New York's Hudson River is the largest toxic waste site in the United States. PCBs dumped decades ago from a pair of General Electric factories summer, the Environmental Protection Agency will decide whether GE have contaminated the Hudson over a two hundred mile area. This should pay to clean up the river--at a cost of $460 million. Environmental groups support the clean up. But the corporation and many local residents are fighting to stop it. In this first of a three-part series, Brian Mann looks at the fierce battle being waged over the Hudson's future.  Go to full article

PCB Contamination of Land May Outstrip Water Pollution

There's compelling new testimony from people living near PCB-laden soil along the Hudson River--there's evidence that the land contamination from the PCBs could be on a much larger scale than the river pollution. Karen Dewitt reports.  Go to full article

ZCA Tops EPA's List of Industrial Toxic Emissions

Martha Foley talks with Nina Habib Spencer, of the EPA in New York City, about the EPA's latest list of industrial toxic emissions. The Zinc Corporation of America Company in Gouverneur released more toxics into the environment than any other industry in the state.  Go to full article

135 Lead Hazard Sites Around Great Lakes

More than 135 sites possibly containing hazardous levels of lead have been found across the Great Lakes. And at least some of those sites could pose a major health risk for humans. The discovery was announced at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Diego. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Dale Willman has more.  Go to full article

Last EPA Hearing on Hudson PCB Dredging

The Environmental Protection Agency held its last public meeting on a plan to dredge toxic PCBs from the Hudson River. The cleanup would cost half a billion dollars. General Electric Corporation has worked hard to discredit the government's proposal. As Brian Mann reports, the debate has left the community bitterly divided.  Go to full article

Wildlife Concern on Upper Hudson: Mink and River Otter Eating PCB Contaminated Fish

The State Department of Environmental Conservation says mink and river otters on the upper Hudson River are contaminated with PCBs. The study was done in an area near Glens Falls, where General Electric dumped thousands of pounds of the toxic substance. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

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