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News stories tagged with "wcs"

Adirondack moose cow and calf (Copyrighted photo courtesy of WCS)
Adirondack moose cow and calf (Copyrighted photo courtesy of WCS)

North Country moose population set to explode

A moose that was tranquilized and moved to a wilderness area after it wandered through Watertown was found dead a day after it was released. Stephen Litwhiler of the state Department of Environmental Conservation told the Associated Press that the 1200-pound bull moose was found dead on Sunday in the Five Ponds Wilderness Area. It will be examined to determine the cause of death. This is the breeding season, and bull moose are on the move looking for mates. Encounters between moose and humans are increasing in the region. Three moose have been hit by cars in the central Adirondacks in the last few weeks. Another was struck by a train in the eastern Adirondacks. Last week, a man was killed on I-93 in St. Johnsbury, Vt. when his car struck a bull moose. Ken Kogut is regional wildlife manager for New York's Department of Environmental Conservation, based in Ray Brook. He told Brian Mann that the moose population in northern New York has reached a tipping point and is expected to increase rapidly.

NOTE: The Wildlife Conservation Society is working with the DEC to collect information about encounters between humans and animals in the Adirondacks, with a focus on moose. If you've had a run-in with wildlife or want to find out more about the study, please click on the WCS link below.  Go to full article
Adirondack loons fitted with radio transmitters (Source:  ACLP)
Adirondack loons fitted with radio transmitters (Source: ACLP)

Satellites Track Adk Loons To Their Winter Grounds & Back Again

Yesterday, we profiled Nina Schoch, head of the Adirondack Cooperative Loon Program. Schoch has been studying loons for six years, measuring their exposure to acid rain and mercury and trying to get an accurate measure of the birds' population. This morning, Brian Mann talks with Schoch about a program developed two years ago that tracks loons using satellites and radio transmitters. The goal was to discover exactly where Adirondack loons spend their winters.  Go to full article

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