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News stories tagged with "weather"

A Swedish rite of spring

It's spring and there is no shortage of rituals and traditions surrounding the arrival of the season of renewal. Many early peoples celebrated for the basic reason that their food supplies would soon be restored. Longer days and more sunlight are a big deal here in the North Country, as well as parts of Canada, Alaska and northern Europe. Colton artist Irja Boden grew up in Sweden where longer days begin as a speck on the late-winter horizon.  Go to full article

Storm-battered North Country still recovering - overnight shelter opened in Ticonderoga, Hague hardest hit

The recovery continues this morning following Saturday's brutal winter storm that knocked out power and closed roads across the North Country. Todd Moe has more.  Go to full article

UPDATE: Storm-battered North Country still recovering - overnight shelter opened in Ticonderoga, Hague hardest hit

The recovery continues this afternoon following Saturday's brutal winter storm that knocked out power and closed roads across the North Country. The hardest-hit areas are southern St. Lawrence County, southern Essex County, and sections of Warren County. In some areas, electricity won't be restored until tomorrow afternoon. Brian Mann has an update.  Go to full article

State of emergency in Tupper Lake

The power is still out, schools are closed and a state of emergency continues today in Tupper Lake after a weekend winter storm that coated trees and power lines with a mixture of freezing rain and heavy, wet snow. Martha Foley reports.  Go to full article

North Country digs out from snow, ice, wind - thousands still without power

Thousands of homes in the North Country are still without power this morning. Heavy snow in the St. Lawrence Valley and a powerful ice storm in Essex and Warren County did the most damage. But power outages stretched to every county in the region. There have been no reports of major injuries or accidents. But as Brian Mann reports, some neighborhoods won't see their power restored until tomorrow afternoon.  Go to full article

Weather lingo: what are snow showers?

You hear the term "snow showers" every so often in NCPR weather forecasts. But who comes up with these descriptions? What are "snow showers" compared to "light snow" or "flurries?" Todd Moe spoke with Burlington meteorologist Conor Lahiff to try to clear up the sometimes confusing language in weather forecasts. So, what exactly are "snow showers?"  Go to full article

North Gower remembers the ice storm

Ice storm conditions in Canada mirrored those across the border in northern New York. Lucy Martin visited North Gower, and found memories there are still vivid. Bruce Seabrook worked the counter at Perkins hardware store.  Go to full article

Weathering the ice storm in the wilderness

While Jack was driving the back roads, Mike Sheridan was working for the state DEC in the Adirondack back country. In the high country, there was no ice, just a massive deluge of rain. Mike now works as the manager of Elk Lake Lodge, but when the ice storm struck in 1998 he was an interior caretaker rescuing stranded snowshoers near Lake Colden. He told his story to Brian Mann.  Go to full article

Utility crews still struggling to restore power

Utility crews are still trying to repair downed power lines caused by this week's wind storm. Jonathan Brown has more.  Go to full article
Prime Minister Jean Cretien visits Ice Storm Headquarters with Osgoode Township Mayor Doug Thompson (1998).
Prime Minister Jean Cretien visits Ice Storm Headquarters with Osgoode Township Mayor Doug Thompson (1998).

The Ice Storm of 1998 - rural Ontario

Weather disasters sometimes turn into misery contests: How bad was it? Who had it worse? In Canada, "the" Ice Storm was blamed for at least 25 deaths, close to a thousand injuries, and damages that hit $3 billion. Off and on, over six long days, a stalled front stretching from Eastern Ontario to Nova Scotia, coated everything in inches of ice. With transportation, communication and power disrupted, the basics of life quickly became critical issues for millions of Canadians. Help came from every sector. Canada ordered that nation's largest-ever domestic deployment. Nearly 16,000 military personal pitched in, while another army of repair crews from across North America showed up to tackle the immense job of restoring crippled utilities. Ten years later, people mostly remember how much communities pulled together. Farm-bred Doug Thompson taught English for 35 years before taking up a second career in municipal politics. Lucy Martin caught up with Thompson as he was looking back at photographs from 10 years ago.  Go to full article

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